RIP Philo

Home Schooling

http://www.newsobserver.com/146/story/550576.html

There's now an estimated 65,000 home-schooled students in the state of North Carolina.  All of which have essentially no place to perform chemistry, biology or physics experiments.

I think if you had enough of them in one area, they could support a business that runs the science labs for them.  You could also promote the lab as a place for advanced students to do college-prep level science after regular school ("science-cram")

The question would be: Once you pay your rent, teachers, and insurance liability, would there be enough money left over for profit?
Permalink Send private email xampl 
March 7th, 2007 4:34pm
> perform chemistry, biology or physics experiments.

Those are of the devil. All knowledge is in the bible.
Permalink son of parnas 
March 7th, 2007 4:37pm
Don't you think most of the home schooled children in North Carolina are being kept out of public school for religious reasons? Therefore their parents won't want them to study science, since science promotes the development of critical faculties and the exercise of free and independent thought. Your proposed business would fail in short order.
Permalink Send private email bon vivant 
March 7th, 2007 4:38pm
according to the article, yes:

> Religious faith remains a primary motivation -- almost 70 percent of those North Carolinians who home-school their children consider themselves "religious schools."
Permalink hello. 
March 7th, 2007 4:40pm
Well, not if your business taught "creation" science.  Thus you'd have to adjust your Chemistry and Physics experiements to get the "right" Biblical answers.

True, this is not "real" science.  But since you're teaching "science" to people who'd rather not learn "real" science, you'd still be able to make some bucks.

Sadly, I find I can't recommend such an unethical practice.  Because until they ran out out of town on a rail, it might be profitable.  See "The Music Man" for more.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
March 7th, 2007 4:42pm
Umm, biology yeah.

"All those dinosaur bones were planted by God for us to find and challenge our faith".

But they couldn't have a problem with Chemistry or Physics, right?
Permalink Send private email xampl 
March 7th, 2007 4:54pm
You may be able to get state funding.

I know of a (state funded) charter school for home schoolers. The kids come in every once in a while for labs, tests, group activities, and etc.
Permalink Send private email no label 
March 7th, 2007 6:12pm
im still deciding whether we want to homeschool the girls.  the considerations are:

Pro:

(1) the schooling system sucks eggs and using it is almost certain to end up with them being drug using street walkers by the age of 16

(2) it gives me an excuse to stay home and play with them.

Con:

(1) if they dont go through the normal school system they will be less socialised to society in general, which would cause them to feel like outsiders.

(2) I would, apparently, have kill ms wSV first.


...Im still considering my options...
Permalink Send private email zestyZuchini 
March 7th, 2007 6:15pm
We plan to homeschool our girls for a few years during a sailing trip, either another circumnavigation or a circle around the Pacific. We know families doing this, and adults who did it as kids, and middle school through junior high seems to be the best ages. They finish their work in a few hours in the morning, much faster than if they were at school.

I don't think it works well for high schoolers, most teenagers really don't want to spend all day with their parents. And the really small kids seem to just love school and being around other kids so much. But 5th through 8th grade were academically useless for me, and the social scene is pretty broken. I thought it was just my school, but my wife says her experience was just as weird-- our group of friends would sit around at recess and randomly pick one of our friends to make fun of that day.
Permalink Send private email no label 
March 7th, 2007 6:34pm
There is nothing wrong with NZ education as this series attests:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Periods_with_Mr_Gormsby

(Wish our reality TV was this good.)

But I think the OP would be flat out attracting enough customers from that demographic to pay for insurance, equipment and consumables (such as the occasional classroom).
Permalink trollop 
March 7th, 2007 6:37pm
>> But I think the OP would be flat out attracting enough customers from that demographic  <<

Not sure I understand -- "flat out" as in total money loser?  Or as in "what an astoundingly stupid idea" ?
Permalink Send private email xampl 
March 7th, 2007 7:56pm
practice makes perfect (myelination is cool) ....

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/04/sports/playmagazine/04play-talent.html?pagewanted=1

Though the article is about female Russian tennis stars there's only one pic (sorry).
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
March 7th, 2007 8:15pm
Science might be a bad choice, but home schoolers are interested in 1. getting a break from the little rats 2. giving themselves and the kids a chance to socialize

So, a business targetting home school kids might work. Come every thursday and learn about the "myth of the dinosaurs" or "evidence for bible stories" or just "art" "music" "kickball" "math"
Permalink bob 
March 7th, 2007 8:31pm
there is a chance that we might have to move into the actual city of Cleveland.  If this happens, our options are home school and private school - no way in hell I'm letting my kids go to Cleveland Municipal Schools.  I'm thinking possibly home school until high school, get enough of a theoretical background, then send them to community college for labs and the like.  It'll be college level basic stuff, but they'd get help at home from my husband and me.  For socialization we'd have to put them in other things, sports or something else.

Or I could keep working and we could do private school.
Permalink the great purple 
March 7th, 2007 9:24pm
xampl, sorry sport, I slipped in a bit of slang there:

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~enigman/australia/slang.html#f

"Flat out" - as in working as fast as possible.
Permalink trollop 
March 7th, 2007 9:39pm
I wish I had the itty bitty brains of some of the posters here. It must be wonderful to go through life being able to just paint people with labels:
"home schooling" = "religious" = "wacky creationist nut"
Permalink Philo 
March 7th, 2007 11:11pm
no but it's like
"home schooling" <approximately equals> "religious" <approximately equals> "wacky creationist nut"
Permalink  
March 7th, 2007 11:24pm
"The cognitive science of religion has the same problem in gaining traction that social psychology has had: everyone thinks that they are experts."

http://www.gnxp.com/blog/2006/04/10-questions-for-justin-l-barrett.php
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
March 7th, 2007 11:31pm
the first leap isn't that hard.....

"home schooling" = "religious"

http://www.crazyontap.com/topic.php?TopicId=16469#193523
Permalink zed 
March 7th, 2007 11:49pm
The only homeschooled kids I know of personally are homeschooled because their parents are religious whackjobs. All out of house activities revolve around the church, so some sort of independant chemistry/science lab would of course have to be run by and for the local megachurch.

>Well, not if your business taught "creation" science.  Thus you'd have to adjust your Chemistry and Physics experiements to get the "right" Biblical answers.
That is of course religious indoctrination, and they go to their church for that.
Permalink Peter 
March 8th, 2007 9:52am
great purple > Or I could keep working and we could do private school.

Only parents home schooling are those who can afford it. Ie, to pay themselves (one of, at least) not to work.

There was a post on Language Log recently noting that most teachers (teachers!) are never trained in how to teach reading (which is really the most important skill before say HS). Well, the only thing that they have training in is the whole-word or immersion method, aka, give the kid a book and let them figure it out. No training between glyphs and phonemes.
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
March 8th, 2007 9:58am
I haven't given it a whole lot of thought, in that I have no kids and even when I do schooling is several years into the whole raising kids thing.  I like knowing that it is an option if the local schools suck.  Most of my students do Kumon in addition to their local schools, so I know I've got resources if I really want to do it.  Non-religious private schools are hard to find and/or hugely expensive ($15k/year?!) and I have mixed feelings about religious private schools.  Ok, so I have thought about it, but not very seriously yet.
Permalink the great purple 
March 8th, 2007 10:58am
The question is whether you can earn more than $15K/year per kid (after taxes) if you work instead of home-schooling your kids.

Most people say yes.
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
March 8th, 2007 11:04am
That's just the monetary axis of parenting.  There's also the "Make sure your kid isn't featured on the TV show 'Cops'" part.
Permalink Send private email xampl 
March 8th, 2007 1:18pm

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