Y'all are a bunch of wankers!

Online Extracurriculars

I interview high-school seniors who apply to my alma mater. I routinely Google these students and discovered that one posted information on his blog that reflects poorly on him. May I ask him about the blog? May I mention it to the university? Should it affect the score I give him?
Permalink Keith Lublin, West Bloomfield, M 
March 11th, 2007 1:03pm
Are you asking here because of the multitudes of postings here that would reflect badly on people? :)

Sure, I'd ask them about it. Why should the fact someone operates a nazi blog in their spare time not influence your evaluation?
Permalink Send private email a2800276 
March 11th, 2007 1:12pm
For the record, the preceding quote was copied straight out of the New York Times.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/11/magazine/11wwlnethicist.t.html
Permalink AMerrickanGirl 
March 11th, 2007 1:14pm
If anyone is posting anything here from a public news source, especially if it contains the real name of a person who isn't actually posting here themselves (Keith Lublin, in this case), please properly cite your source and put quotes between quotation marks.

If by some weird happenstance, Mr. Lublin is actually posting here on CoT, I apologize, but otherwise, whoever posted this, you should know better.
Permalink AMerrickanGirl 
March 11th, 2007 1:19pm
The NYT article is very strange.

They say "You would not read someone’s old-fashioned pen-and-paper diary without consent; you should regard a blog similarly."

Um, no, a blog is actually not the same as the private diary hidden under the bed...
Permalink Practical Economist 
March 11th, 2007 1:21pm
Wow, and then it continues:

"The column on Feb. 25 included a query from Wendy Rawlings, a professor in a creative-writing program who was concerned that a colleague had submitted a student’s story to a fiction anthology without the student’s knowledge. ...
Rawlings asked that her name be withheld from publication — which we would have done in this case — but I failed to see that request in her e-mail message."

WTF! OK, so let's continue to call more attention to the poor woman!
Permalink Practical Economist 
March 11th, 2007 1:25pm
Wow what a fucked up response the NYT came up with:

"You should not Google these students in the first place, let alone make your dubious discoveries a factor in college acceptance.

You would not read someone’s old-fashioned pen-and-paper diary without consent; you should regard a blog similarly."

Because a blog is JUST LIKE A DIARY. Apart from the fact that they're explicitly published on a public medium so that the general public can read them.
Permalink Send private email a2800276 
March 11th, 2007 1:25pm
Yes you can ask and even if you don't you can use it as part of your assessment (as long as you're sure it's the same person). I don't see what benefit it would be to mention it in your review, but you can ask your alumni liaison directly can't you?

I remember when I applied to Harvard there were only two interviewing alumni in my area. One was a WASPy uptight old money kind of guy (mahogany library and all that). The other was a effusive, talkative woman (a Jewish school psychologist, if that helps frame the picture).

Unfortunately she was the mother of one of my best friends in HS so she opted out of the conflict of interest of interviewing me as she had known me for 10+ years and liked me. I never clicked with the WASPy guy -- it was just one of those kind of interviews where both people keep up their defenses and it goes no where. (If only he would have given me a shot of that Scotch I know he liked to imbibe himself in his frumpy old library!)

Still bumped I could have been interviewed by the friendly lady (my friend, her son, did go to Harvard as did both his brothers - in fact, all five of them did, the cardiologist father, too) as I kinda think that was the major factor in not getting in (I got into the other 4 schools I applied to).
Permalink anon cause embarassed 
March 11th, 2007 1:25pm
Anything you publish on the web under your name should be considered public knowledge, unless there's a way of restricting access to your material solely to the people on your Friends list.  How Facebook and MySpace handle that stuff, I don't know.
Permalink AMerrickanGirl 
March 11th, 2007 1:29pm
"Wendy Rawlings, a professor in a creative-writing program who was concerned that a colleague had submitted a student’s story to a fiction anthology without the student’s knowledge...we investigated further and determined that the ethical question was moot: the student had in fact agreed to let the story be submitted."

Wendy Rawlings is a busy-body.  She didn't even have her facts right.
Permalink bob 
March 11th, 2007 1:41pm
> Anything you publish on the web under your name should be considered public knowledge

The author's (Randy Cohen) contention is that these are minors and they don't know what they're doing as much as an adult would, so we should judge them by a slightly different set of standards than we do adults (as we do with the juvenile criminal system and with things like alcohol and cigarettes, etc).

That's his position. It has some credibility: kids are stupid.

A few years ago I submitted a question to the NYT (and NPR's) The Ethicist". He was kind enough to respond, but not kind enough to tell me what to do.
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
March 11th, 2007 1:50pm
oh.. strawberry..  the suspense.  What did you write about?  What reply did you get?  Inquiring minds want to know.
Permalink bob 
March 11th, 2007 1:51pm
The request concerned a crazy girlfriend. The response was to ask a therapist.
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
March 11th, 2007 1:53pm

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