1. I accept that I am under the control of a higher power (Muppet).

I wish I were 16. or 60.

Or at least European. The happiness U-curve. And the happiness EU-curve.

http://www.slate.com/id/2161925/

and more:

>> The difference in happiness of men between men of my [American] generation, born in the 1960s, and my father's generation, born in the 1920s, is the same as the effect of a tenfold difference in income. In other words, if my father had little money compared to his contemporaries and I have lots of money compared to mine, I can still expect to be less happy. Here, curiously, the European pattern diverges. Happiness falls for the birth years from 1900 to about 1950, and generations born on the continent since World War II have gotten successively happier.
Permalink Send private email sour grape snowflake 
March 16th, 2007 12:31pm
that paragraph is calling out for a heavy dose of the visual display of quantitative information.
Permalink zed 
March 16th, 2007 12:41pm
1950s you say? Isn't that when they started prescribing anti-depressants en masse? Is the study really about happiness (which I think is quite rare), or is it more about just not caring? (very easy with the right pill regimen.)
Permalink Practical Economist 
March 16th, 2007 12:57pm
Ah, OK, actually in the US, home of the happy meal, happy pill, and happiness guarantee, the happiness has plummeted since the 1950s, whereas in Europe it has steadily risen.

That's very interesting.

Not surprising is that the ultra rich in the US are happy, and the poor and suffering unhappy.

Put these together and you see that socialism what has made europeans more happy.
Permalink Practical Economist 
March 16th, 2007 1:01pm

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