Nobody likes to be called a dummy by a dummy.

How_we_learned_to_stop_having_fun

http://digg.com/health/How_we_learned_to_stop_having_fun

<quote>
The pressure to succeed today is unbelievable. You have to go to school and get good grades to get a good job and make a lot of money to be happy. Gotta have a perfect model look or you wont get the hot guy or girl, which will make you 'happy', and they make a lot of money. Some how money got sewn in with success and happiness. Sitting in traffic for two hours a day, stressing you out, just to make ends meet, barely. The fact that you have to go to work is just a model for people above you to succeed, you do the rowing and they collect the money.

I think to be truly happy, you have to do what you enjoy. Think Michael Bolton and the janitor line...
</quote>
Permalink son of parnas 
April 4th, 2007 1:33am
Now_you've_stopped_even_trying_at_least_next_time_pull_the_title_from_the_page_and_not_the_URL
Permalink Send private email Сергей РахманиноB 
April 4th, 2007 1:43am
We should all try to be like Michael Bolton. He's got a desperate housewife.
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
April 4th, 2007 1:54am
I think she meant the other Michael Bolton, of "office space" fame?
Permalink AMerrickanGirl 
April 4th, 2007 6:13am
<quote>The pressure to succeed today is unbelievable.</quote>

Bah. That's only for losers that give in to that mainstream "keeping up with the Jones'" crap and don't know how to be happy.
Permalink Send private email Сергей РахманиноB 
April 4th, 2007 7:08am
Anyone who lives their life bowing to external pressure needs to step back and reevaluate their goals, or shut up and quit bitching about how exhausted they are.
Permalink AMerrickanGirl 
April 4th, 2007 7:15am
Amen sister. Preach it like it is.
Permalink Send private email Сергей РахманиноB 
April 4th, 2007 7:18am
Funny, I thought the pressure was only for the "winners who are determined not to give up".  The loser's have decided to play a different game, with different rules, and different values.

Sure, they 'lose' in the rat-race.  Perhaps they 'win' in other, more valuable ways.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
April 4th, 2007 9:23am
So many things were beginning to happen in 1621.  The beginnings of the industrial revolution.  The King James Bible.  Protestantism.  The New World.

I'd propose it was at that point that sufficient surplus wealth was finally being generated, that some people could move off the farms.  When you're farming, you don't have TIME to be depressed, or it doesn't matter if you are, those cows still have to be milked.

Also, in farming there are relatively simple skills that get applied again and again, and have a positive pay off.  Boring, yes, mind-numbing perhaps, but I think there's something very satisfying in it.

It's these city-based people who are trying to achieve financial independence and a contemplative life, who have time and philosophies to realize that much of life is "grubby and short".  And get depressed by that, instead of just accepting it and going on in a contented way.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
April 4th, 2007 9:29am
> Now_you've_stopped_even_trying

Yah, sorry, my computer was rebooting so I ran out of time.
Permalink son of parnas 
April 4th, 2007 9:54am
> instead of just accepting it and going on in a contented way.

Don't worry, be happy? Sure.
Permalink son of parnas 
April 4th, 2007 10:14am
> it was at that point that sufficient surplus wealth was finally being generated, that some people could move off the farms.

As opposed to the Assyrians and the Egyptians and the Indus Valley civilizations thousands of years earlier?

It seems a little artificial to backdate the Industrial Revolution and to put it smack on the beginning of the colonization of the US. The Renaissance had started much earlier (and helped discover N America in the first place). What amazes me is how little N America meant to Europeans. Really: Manhattan was traded away for some spice island? Canada was swapped back and forth? Napoleon sold what is now a third of the US for a small fee? Russia sold Alaska? etc.

Perhaps we should credit the Enlightenment to the founding of the first stock market/joint stock corporations (Amsterdam, Dutch East Indies Company, 1606) which began formalizing a way to handle all that surplus capital, and its risks.
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
April 4th, 2007 11:37am
Well, the 1620 time came from the article, when people started identifying it as "melancholia".

I suppose there were depressed Egyptians and Assyrians.  But probably as a percentage of the population they were less.

Oh, of course, the Bible documents how unhappy the Jewish diaspora people were.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
April 4th, 2007 1:16pm
You read the article? Wow. Awesome. :)

I think this ... people feel good when they have worthwhile connections to things outside their own ego ('something greater than themselves'). But technological change reshuffles connections. Those caught in the reshuffle feel a lot of distress because the connections/meanings they grew up with no longer hold (like that article about the dying farm life on the American plain). And only some, possibly very few, brains are pliable enough to *feel* connected in the new configuration that technology enables.

The reshuffle is so strong that people even come up with new words to express that distress as they don't feel that the old culture understood *their* specific sense of disconnection. So taedium vitae, melancholy, Weltschmerz,  ennui, and depression are all invented anew by poets experiencing the loss of old interconnections.

Also I googled a bit and discovered that the Muscovy Company was the first company we would recognize as such: it had legal personality as its called (right to sue and be sued in return).
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
April 4th, 2007 1:42pm
Napoleon had to choose between selling to us or losing it to the British, I don't know that it had anything to do with the value he placed on it.
Permalink Lurk Machine 
April 4th, 2007 2:29pm
Michael Bolton is Jewish and used to tour with Ozzy Osbourne? And he's now with Nicollette Sheridan. And she used to be on Knots Landing, that show from the 80s? How old is she anyway? Did not know any of these things. You guys are supposed to keep me more up to date with the celebrity gossip doings.
Permalink Practical Economist 
April 5th, 2007 8:50am
Nicolette is 43, born in Enlgand and part Punjabi Indian?!? She sure doesn't look it.
Permalink Practical Economist 
April 5th, 2007 8:52am
She also married Harry Hamlin just for the citizenship, and ditched him soon after.
Permalink Lurk Machine 
April 5th, 2007 11:45am

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other topics: April, 2007 Other topics: April, 2007 Recent topics Recent topics