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What happens more in the U.S. than suicide?

Nailgun Injuries

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?alias=nailgun-injuries-soar-amo&chanID=sa003
Permalink JoC 
April 13th, 2007 10:11am
Possibly not entirely disjoint stats:

http://www.crazyontap.com/topic.php?TopicId=17493&Posts=29
Permalink trollop 
April 13th, 2007 10:19am
Wow.  But it's more like "Have a <nail> gun, injure yourself", no?
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
April 13th, 2007 10:22am
You really have to be an idiot to injure yourself with a modern nailgun unless it malfunctions, or you drop it on your foot since they're pretty damned heavy.
Permalink Send private email muppet 
April 13th, 2007 10:25am
They try to make it difficult on purpose.  There's a link in the front of the gun that's supposed to insure you're pushing the gun into something before it will fire.

Still, shooting a nail into your foot is fairly easy to do, as is shooting a nail through dry-wall (missing the stud, darn) and into somebody on the other side.

Karma.  Hmm.  Muppet, probably you should never purchase a nail gun.  Probably I should never purchase a nail gun either.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
April 13th, 2007 10:37am
From the article: "Emergency departments treated three times as many consumers with nail-gun injuries in 2005 as they did in 1991"

How much of that increase corresponds to the increased number of nail guns that have been sold? In 1991, a powered nail gun was an expensive tool for contractors and couldn't even be purchased at a local hardware store. In 2005, nail guns are relatively inexpensive and are sold almost everywhere and I would guess that there are many many more than three times as many nail-guns owned by consumers in 2005 compared to 1991.

Nail guns do have safety features, but most of them can be switched to a less safe mode - where you hold the trigger down and a nail is fired every time you "bump" the nail gun (press it against something). Also, I have seen some people (admittedly, more often contractors) completely remove or disable the safety features (or tie wrap them into a permanent engaged position). Also, as someone stated above, even with all the safety features working correctly, accidents can happen when the user misses the stud or the nail is fired at an inappropriate angle and protrudes through the side of the wood (possibly into a hand holding the piece of wood).
Permalink Philip 
April 13th, 2007 12:01pm
The right of the people to keep and bear nail guns should not be infringed.
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
April 13th, 2007 12:09pm
I agree that the injuries are up because the number of untrained people using them is up.

Also want to see some raw statistics when these stories come out. Are those with nailgun access more likely to hurt themselves with it than those with handgun access are? If so, then arguments to regulate or ban handguns should bring up the nailgun issue, as well as frying pans, staplers, soda bottles, and anything else with more interesting statistics.
Permalink Practical Economist 
April 13th, 2007 1:33pm
Don't forget corned beef tins...

  http://www.dti.gov.uk/files/file21453.pdf
Permalink Billx 
April 13th, 2007 6:47pm

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