Nobody likes to be called a dummy by a dummy.

Beer five bucks a pint in England?

I was reading that the pound is now up to $2 due to the collapse of the US dollar. It was mentioned that petrol is 85 pence a liter, so 3.7854118 liters per gallon, then 3.22 pounds per gallon, thus $6.44 a gallon. Hm, that's better than I thought, it's up to $4 a gallon here in parts of the US.

But £2.56 or $5.12 for a pint of beer, even though that's the british 20 oz pint, is that in a pub or beer you buy for the house?

I make my own beer here and it tends to run me about 25 cents per 22 oz bottle, which is 20 times less than the price in Britain.

Do a lot of Brits make their own beer as well nowadays, or do they just pay £2.56?
Permalink Practical Economist 
April 17th, 2007 2:33pm
Brits drink in pubs.  It is the national sport, second equal with (or sometimes combined with), watching football (the real kind, not the grid iron kind).

As for gallons, be aware that British gallons are about 1.2 US gallons, although petrol (gasoline) is now sold in the UK by the litre (liter)
Permalink  
April 17th, 2007 2:45pm
More than 2.56 usually. In London it hovers around 3 quid ($6). I pay just under that for a coffee.

Making your own is always cheaper of course.
Permalink Colm 
April 17th, 2007 2:45pm
$6 for roughly half a liter of beer isn't that expensive, about the same as in Germany and most of first world Europe + island premium. Don't forget that this is proper beer we're talking about and not MGD.
Permalink Send private email a2800276 
April 17th, 2007 2:48pm
Yeah, I don't drink the pisswater they sell at WalMart.

It's all a bit strange since the last time I was on the Continent, good beer cost less than soda or drinking water.
Permalink Practical Economist 
April 17th, 2007 3:22pm
That still seems a little screwed. I can get a 32 oz bottle of Corsendonk for about $8 and that's imported from freakin' Belgium.

It's rather hilarious seeing Bud/Bud Light as some kind of trendy hip thing.

http://corsendonk.apluz.be/
Permalink JoC 
April 17th, 2007 3:53pm
it's kind of dumb. I pay 5 € for a Guiness here, about 2 for a very good bottle of one of the local Trappiste beers.
Permalink $-- 
April 17th, 2007 4:07pm
For those who want it, you can enjoy a bit of classical music if you go to that site, btw...
Permalink JoC 
April 17th, 2007 4:09pm
Yeah pints usually go for about £2/£3.

Cans vary from 70p to £1.

Still thats good though right?

When I go to Ireland i'm paying like 5/6 euro a pint
Permalink what are you reading for? 
April 17th, 2007 4:22pm
Is it then that the price is a sort of a cover charge and that people tend to drink it slowly and limit one pint?
Permalink Practical Economist 
April 17th, 2007 5:02pm
A six pack of guiness is around $8 at the qwikie mart, btw, though it's not real guiness, it's brewed in canada or something.
Permalink Practical Economist 
April 17th, 2007 5:03pm
In a pub you are paying for the maintenance of the establishment as well as the drink. A pint (20 oz/500 ml) of premium beer in a bottle from a supermarket costs about £1.60 give or take. Multi-packs and cans are cheaper than that.

Here in the US a six-pack of decent beer costs $5 - $7, that's 72 oz or 3 1/2 Imperial pints. Large single bottles are more expensive though; say $3 - $4 just like UK prices. Also $5 for a beer in a bar or restaurant is not much different.
Permalink Send private email bon vivant 
April 17th, 2007 5:13pm
OK, that's what I was wondering, if the quoted price was the bar price or not. Sounds like the pub price is pretty much the same as in the US for one that size and quality.
Permalink Practical Economist 
April 17th, 2007 7:12pm
£1.60 for a 500ml bottle? Where do you shop? It must be very nice beer :)

I don't know about limiting, i'm part of the binge generation we dash £50 away a night and I drink with alot of Irish people so it tends to be aout £100 ha
Permalink what are you reading for? 
April 17th, 2007 8:15pm
I like nice beer. Go to Tesco or whereever and find the shelf with the bottles of Shepherd Neame Spitfire, Marston's Pedigree, Fullers London Pride, Hook Norton Old Hookey, and so on, and let me know what they cost these days, eh? Tescos sometimes had a 4 for £5 offer, but only on selected bottles and not always the ones I wanted.

Now you've got me salivating. I must go buy some Hobgoblin on the way home from work.
Permalink Send private email bon vivant 
April 17th, 2007 8:35pm
Now if only us Yanks could make good beer, we'd get lots of visitors hopping over chugging a few and tip the dollar/pound ratio back below 2.
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
April 17th, 2007 8:53pm
You do make good beer, but there's a tendency to turn everything up to 11. More hops, more malt, more alcohol, more everything. The result can be a bit overpowering. Sometimes less is more, you know?

(I'll make an exception for Arrogant Bastard, though. That beer can make me forgive a lot.)
Permalink Send private email bon vivant 
April 17th, 2007 9:34pm
If in Oregon try Black Butte. (No this is not a Don Imus joke.)
Permalink Send private email strawberry snowflake 
April 17th, 2007 9:46pm
"More hops, more malt, more alcohol, more everything."

That's an interesting observation. It's either pisswater or it's 11. There is no middle.
Permalink Practical Economist 
April 17th, 2007 11:37pm
Prices vary.

Pints in pubs in London - about £3

bottles of beers in clubs  - about £4

Double wiskey in nice bars - £6

bottles of beer at the huge supermarkets - £12 for 24 (typically on special) ... do the math - about £0.50 each

No one really balks at paying £3 or £4 for a pint in London. It is only when you go to some of the smaller towns/cities that you realise just how expensive London is.
Permalink Send private email Tapiwa 
April 18th, 2007 1:44pm
-----"Is it then that the price is a sort of a cover charge and that people tend to drink it slowly and limit one pint?"----

I think you ought to visit the UK; preferably the main square of one of these nice olde market towns on a Saturday night!

As for drinking beer at home a large proportion of the population buys the beer from France or Belgium at knock-down prices (you can fill the car with about a thousand cans of beer and still not pay any duty; the limit is normally set by the suspension). This is also true of cigarrettes and hand-rolling tobacco, though importing that is not quite so legal.

One of the leading salesemen on the Continent is an ex-barrow boy. He says he's made so much money he wants to retire, but Brown keeps putting the tax up on alcohol and cigs and making his business too profitable.
Permalink Send private email Stephen Jones 
April 18th, 2007 7:39pm
Theoretically, as goods bought in another EU country are duty paid, as long as the goods are not going to be resold, UK customs cannot impose any limits. Needless to say, they don't like it and seek to impose illegal limits anyway. The limit on cigarettes is currently 3,200 per person (should be enough for most people).
Permalink Billx 
April 19th, 2007 11:16am

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other topics: April, 2007 Other topics: April, 2007 Recent topics Recent topics