Home of the Muppet Imperial Moderator Corps

College degree equivalence?

I kind of forgot to go to college in developing my career.

Ten years later I'm moving towards more management oriented roles, but I wonder years down the line if I will miss real opportunities because of totally immutable rules on hiring/promotion regarding college degrees.

Is there anything equivalent?
Permalink Michael B 
July 2nd, 2007 11:43am
I've had managers who only had associates degrees in business admin.
Permalink JoC 
July 2nd, 2007 12:01pm
No, not if the people doing the hiring have college degrees.  There's a possibly irrational prejudice against hiring those without degrees, held mostly by those with degrees.  Your best bet would be to have a portfolio of work that demonstrates you are capable of performing at the same level as those with college degrees, at the same level of responsibility as the position you're trying to move into.

You're still probably going to get fucked though.  Sad statement in life.
Permalink Send private email Clay Dowling 
July 2nd, 2007 12:03pm
Yes, I'm feeling the long term management ceiling without a master's.
Permalink Send private email strawberry soubriquet 
July 2nd, 2007 12:04pm
> I wonder years down the line if I will miss real opportunities

Definitely. If you are serious about management an MBA is the minimum entrance requirement, unless you can start a small company and rise that way. Still, even that experience may not be enough.

Most of the techies I know interested in the management track go to MBA school.
Permalink son of parnas 
July 2nd, 2007 12:05pm
MBA is impossible without first going through 4 year college, in my understanding. : /
Permalink Michael B 
July 2nd, 2007 12:08pm
> MBA is impossible without first going through 4 year college, in my understanding.

If you are focussed you can a 4 year degree in 3 years. Plus you can take a lot of the classes you need for a MBA, so the whole process could take 4 or 5 years.
Permalink son of parnas 
July 2nd, 2007 12:12pm
On the other hand getting a college degree at 28 is better than one at 21 because when you put down your graduation date  on your resume people think you're younger.
Permalink Send private email strawberry soubriquet 
July 2nd, 2007 12:16pm
On the other hand it might be fun to get an associates degree in economics.  Might be more compatible with my lifestyle and get me at least some paper cred.
Permalink Michael B 
July 2nd, 2007 12:16pm
But racking up all the PE credits you need for that associates degree might be a pain.
Permalink Send private email a2800276 
July 2nd, 2007 12:34pm
My parents never went to school past the 5th grade.  My siblings were all dropouts.  I was bucking the trend simply by getting a high school diploma.  Typical fair for immigrant families: they focused on business instead of books.

They're all successful in their own right but the lifestyle they all have is not one I look forward to.
Permalink Michael B 
July 2nd, 2007 12:37pm
>>But racking up all the PE credits you need for that associates degree might be a pain.<<

PE credits?  Phys-ed?  Sounds like a plus. ;)
Permalink Michael B 
July 2nd, 2007 12:38pm
Co-ed swim classes.  That's the ticket.
Permalink xampl 
July 2nd, 2007 12:49pm
I took fencing.  Great class.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
July 2nd, 2007 12:50pm
Yes it was.

If I had to do over, I'd take golf though. I'm getting into it.
Permalink JoC 
July 2nd, 2007 12:57pm
Don't waste your time with the associates.  Unless it's for something technical, like welding or diesel engine repair, it's chief value will be in covering up some blank wall space. 

You need a bachelor's before the degree has any value at all.  As others mentioned, if you're looking for a management track, you'll ultimately need an MBA.  There are a few MBA programs that let you attend classes on nights and weekends, which might be a good option if you're keeping the day job.  But yes, you need the B.S. degree first.
Permalink Send private email Clay Dowling 
July 2nd, 2007 1:20pm
Michael B, it's not too late to get a degree, especially since you're fairly young anyway, so it's worth it. 

You can get an entire accredited associate degree online from Charter Oak State College (I used to work there).  Note the "accredited" emphasis; that is important if you want to go on to graduate study.  They also award bachelor's degrees but you have to get some of the credits from other places and transfer them in.

They have a lot of 3-credit eight-week accelerated courses so you can rack up a lot of credits in a short amount of time.  And their prices aren't that bad even though you're not a Connecticut resident.

Email me if you want more info.  Even though I left on not the greatest of terms, I still recommend it as a great option for adults who need a degree in a short amount of time.
Permalink AMerrickanGirl 
July 2nd, 2007 1:39pm
FWIW, I'm a later in life degree guy, and I assure you having a degree made it easier for me. Much easier.

I also recall struggling with the question when I was 31, and asking my boss at the time (a very cool guy) whether he thought it's be worth it. After all, I said, I'd be in my late thirties by the time I got through the undergrad and masters.

His response? "How old will you be then if you don't get them?".
Permalink Send private email Mongo 
July 2nd, 2007 3:34pm
I'm inspired.

I have an appointment with an admissions adviser tomorrow afternoon.  The course-list for the BA in Economics is full of exciting looking classes.
Permalink Michael B 
July 2nd, 2007 6:22pm

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other topics: July, 2007 Other topics: July, 2007 Recent topics Recent topics