Reconciling assholes for nearly a decade.

Find out the owner of a phone number?

Does anyone know of a way to find out the owner of a cell phone if you know their number? I see many sites for reverse lookups for cell phones but they charge almost 100 bucks.

All of the free reverse phone number sites have a fee after you put in the phone number. Anywho.com or whitepages.com or any of that stuff does not work since you have to pay to get a report.

Are there any ACTUAL free ones out there?
Permalink Send private email jmmbacon 
July 7th, 2007 3:49am
Cell phones are kind of their own thing. It's a lot easier to do a look up for a land line, if it's listed somewhere. If the number doesn't come up on google or the standard phone sites, then you'll have to try and pay. You should know that 99% of the time after you pay the $100 they will just tell you "This number is in a block assigned to Verizon" or some such useless info.
Permalink Practical Economist 
July 7th, 2007 4:34am
Cell phone numbers are much more delicate than land phone numbers.

Whilst the number of people who chose to be off directory for their fixed line are a small majority, I suspect they would be in the majority for cell phones.
Permalink Send private email Stephen Jones 
July 7th, 2007 5:21am
Especially since in the US you pay for incoming calls.

I do *not* want to be receiving "Did you know now is the perfect time to refinance your mortgage?" calls while I'm in a meeting at work, much less pay for the priviledge.
Permalink Send private email xampl 
July 7th, 2007 7:23am
I just do not understand the thinking behind 'receiver pays' for mobile phones in the USA, it just counter-intuitive, the person with the motivation and need to make the call is the caller not the callee so they should be the ones who pay. This single screw-up has probably put mobile-phone ownership in the States back by about 5 years compared with the rest of the world
Permalink Billx 
July 7th, 2007 9:00am
You what?

The post office worked out that "caller pays" long ago.

This MS article is actually pretty damn good:

http://research.microsoft.com/research/sv/PennyBlack/
Permalink trollop 
July 7th, 2007 9:32am
The main motivation behind the pennyblack project is not to get rid of spam. It's to create public acceptance of a system in which all email can be traced back to its source with complete reliability.
Permalink Practical Economist 
July 7th, 2007 12:50pm
Sri Lanka also has this receiver pays crap when a mobile receives a call from a fixed line.

The reason originally was that they realized that to get the network implanted they wanted to make it easy to call from a fixed line, and so kept the charge the same for the fixed line as making a local call. People got into the habit of calling from a fixed line and so passing the real charge on to them would have meant a big increase in fixed line phone bills. The companies proposed this anyway (after all mobile phones are so common now that it's probably the person with the landline who is the richer of the two) but there was a big stink and some political parties forced an official review, at which the arguments in favour of the caller pays system were so badly presented that the change was rejected.

It's a mess because even if you receive the call from abroad money is charged, so when a Sri Lankan working abroad calls his family often the call won't go through because they have used up all the money in the pre-paid card.
Permalink Send private email Stephen Jones 
July 9th, 2007 2:36am

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