Sanding our assholes with 150 grit.

Why can't I just win the lottery already?

I wasn't cut out to work 9-5.  I'm just not wired for it.

I'm artistic, I'm creative, I'm smart, but I'm not business savvy.  I'll never successfully run a business, so that means a grey life working for grey people.  That or suicide seem to be my options unless I win the lottery.

All that said, it just seems that I'm MEANT to become horrendously wealthy with little or no effort, so why's fate taking so long to play out?
Permalink Send private email muppet 
July 9th, 2007 1:04pm
Because you're not lucky.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
July 9th, 2007 1:05pm
Time management is hard.
Permalink Michael B 
July 9th, 2007 1:09pm
Karma.
Permalink Send private email Locutus of Borg 
July 9th, 2007 1:22pm
LOL

If you only knew about my karma.  My karma is fucking sparkling.
Permalink Send private email muppet 
July 9th, 2007 1:23pm
And now it's all gone.
Permalink Michael B 
July 9th, 2007 1:27pm
ha. I wonder the same thing.  I'd love to run a business but it turns out that a) I need health insurance, and b) I don't like people enough.

I'd be willing to work on b) if I had a solution to a).

The funny thing is, it doesn't show online, but I bet muppet likes people more than I do.
Permalink the great purple 
July 9th, 2007 1:36pm
Why do you need health insurance? Do you take meds you need the subscription benefits on or something? Chronic condition?
Permalink Send private email JoC 
July 9th, 2007 1:40pm
> but I'm not business savvy.

what does business savvy mean? isn't the only thing that distinguishes a worker bee from a b-man/woman is the constant renegotiating of business contracts (*)?

the worker bee buys into (relative) stability of relationship to work. the business person eats risk for breakfast.

(*) constant is relative. the corner store negotiates a relationship every time a customer walks in. the freelancer, every chunk of work.
Permalink Send private email strawdog sobriquet 
July 9th, 2007 1:44pm
"what does business savvy mean?"

If you have to ask...
Permalink Send private email Philo 
July 9th, 2007 1:49pm
God hates you.
Permalink son of parnas 
July 9th, 2007 1:49pm
I have a lottery ticket in my busted car.


*crosses fingers*


Wouldn't that be ironic? :)
Permalink Send private email JoC 
July 9th, 2007 1:51pm
Why do self-employed people think they can't get health insurance?
Permalink Michael B 
July 9th, 2007 2:08pm
"All that said, it just seems that I'm MEANT to become horrendously wealthy with little or no effort, so why's fate taking so long to play out?"

I hear you man.  I think I have those traits too, but I am not business savvy and not really good with people.  I had a couple of business tech projects with others in college and out of school but I hated working with them so much that I just kind of drifted off.

If I do anything, entrepreneur wise.  It will probably be on my own.  I dont even know if I could work for someones crappy startup.

Also, I hate to be an asshole(I say this a lot now).  I have some aging relatives that have done ok.  I always wonder if I got a little something from them and invested it and could work on my own.
Permalink Bot Berlin 
July 9th, 2007 2:09pm
Because individual plans tend to be horrendously expensive.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
July 9th, 2007 2:09pm
"  I have some aging relatives that have done ok"

That sounds mean, but if I got offed, I would give everything I had to my family.
Permalink Bot Berlin 
July 9th, 2007 2:11pm
I keep explaining to my son, that the phrase on TV give-aways "Many will enter!  Few will win!" means

"You are NOT one of the few."

Because the original point of the addvert is to give the kids a FALSE sense that they ARE one of the few winners.  Why else enter?
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
July 9th, 2007 2:14pm
>> "what does business savvy mean?"

> If you have to ask...

I guess I was saying a both take on risk. just in different forms. the person who plays the lottery every week should not give up their day job. it would break the equilibrium.
Permalink Send private email strawdog sobriquet 
July 9th, 2007 2:19pm
D. None of the above.

It is guts. Sheer balls of steel. When you have the guts to throw away everything you have to get what you don't have, you will find you won't need a lottery ticket. I admit, I'm a comfortable coward. I didn't encash on my ideas. I gave it away to someone in return for a stable employment, because I know I can make a sale. But only once.
Permalink Send private email (100+85)/2 
July 9th, 2007 2:24pm
+1 Karma.
Permalink Colm 
July 9th, 2007 2:28pm
Sadly, for every 100 with Sheer Balls Of Steel, maybe 10% make it.  The rest cash in their Sheer Balls Of Steel, then wind up in a trailer park somewhere wondering what went wrong.

On the other hand, if you DON'T cash in your Sheer Balls Of Steel, you may just wind up with an 'average' life, making $100,000 or so, maintaining that nice middle-class house, trying to save enough to send your kids to college and retire.

Better than the trailer park, but not as good as "Making It".  Much less risk involved, though.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
July 9th, 2007 2:38pm
> "The funny thing is, it doesn't show online, but I bet muppet likes people more than I do"


It does show and is showing right now.
Permalink you'rebeingjerky 
July 9th, 2007 2:43pm
"The rest cash in their Sheer Balls Of Steel, then wind up in a trailer park somewhere wondering what went wrong."

You that "trust your instincts" saying.  I still kind of feel that holds true for a lot of us.  Kind of like, instinctively knowing when to get into the bath when it is just that right temperature.  I think the same can be said for our careers or business ventures.  I believe we are all kind of playing the field a little bit and waiting for something to happen but not just jump in.

What fascinates me are people that work the 9-5 and have all kinds of money saved up.  My parents are like that.  They both worked 35+ years in 9-5 education positions but never spent a dime and now are ok for retirement and can spend money if they need to.  (eg, they are getting a new house in houston now and renting the one in Atlanta).  But to me, working 35 years and then saying "Ok, now I have the right amount to be comfortable" seems like a waste of life (my humble opinion).
Permalink Bot Berlin 
July 9th, 2007 2:44pm
The Depression Era people are WAY more careful about risk and loss than the baby-boomers which came after.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
July 9th, 2007 2:50pm
"Depression Era" you are going waaaay back arent you.
Permalink Bot Berlin 
July 9th, 2007 2:51pm
how can you be smart and not business savvy?
Permalink Kenny 
July 9th, 2007 3:08pm
Oops.  2007 - 35 == 1972.  That's hardly depression era.  Sorry, I guess I was talking more about my father -- born 1932 or so.  I lost a grandfather to suicide due to the depression, he couldn't get a job, with two little girls and a wife to support.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
July 9th, 2007 3:12pm
> how can you be smart and not business savvy?

like good at programming, but not good at salary negotiation.

or good at math, but interested in academic work not wall street finance math.

or an artist ahead of his time.  surely you can think back to elementary school about some artist or founding father or  social activist who was smart but broke?
Permalink zed 
July 9th, 2007 3:12pm
> Because individual plans tend to be horrendously expensive.

I called up Cigna one day and asked for coverage.  They insured my wife and I for about $550/mo.  We're mid-20s.

On the downside, we were insured by Cigna. :(
Permalink Michael B 
July 9th, 2007 3:59pm
I am betting that the $550 a month is with a $3000 deductible.  Throw a child into that (NO, Not Really) and you would be closer to $900 a month.  Oh, did you want dental care too? Add $50 a month.
Permalink Send private email dcawvive 
July 9th, 2007 8:52pm

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