Sanding our assholes with 150 grit.

nice folks the taliban

The Taliban, who have threatened to kill 23 South Korean hostages unless an equal number of their own fighters are released, extended on Sunday the deadline of their ultimatum by 24 hours, according to a man identifying himself as a spokesman for the insurgent group.

The South Koreans are members of a Protestant church group who were on a 10-day relief mission; most are women in their 20s and 30s, including nurses and teachers.
Permalink guess worker 
July 22nd, 2007 6:10pm
lets have some bets.  Ive got $10 that says the koreans are toast*








* I have no intention to pay regardless of outcome or circumstances.
Permalink worldsSmallestViolin 
July 22nd, 2007 6:14pm
I'll take that. Ive got $10 that says the koreans are freed unharmed* 








* I have no intention to pay regardless of outcome or circumstances.
Permalink guess worker 
July 22nd, 2007 6:15pm
its on.  anyone else want a piece of this action?
Permalink worldsSmallestViolin 
July 22nd, 2007 6:18pm
While we are models of virtue:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/11/01/AR2005110101644.html - CIA Holds Terror Suspects in Secret Prisons
Permalink son of parnas 
July 22nd, 2007 6:46pm
Pretty damn stupid to go there as a Christian organisation.

They don't want Christianity there.

Christians have brought them English occupation, Russian occupation, American occupation.
Permalink Send private email Erik Springelkamp 
July 22nd, 2007 6:57pm
Nice logic.  The sort of thing a four year old child or an african grey parrot might come up with.  Do you really consider the soviet union a christian power?
Permalink lz 
July 22nd, 2007 7:31pm
>Do you really consider the soviet union a christian power?
To the mujahadin, all 3 invading empires were non-muslim, and therefore the agents of satan.
Permalink Peter 
July 22nd, 2007 7:34pm
Yes. But notice that I said Russian, not Soviet.

The history of the Russian state is one of growth against the Muslim remains of the Mongol Empire, of which they were once a part.

And the Russian Orthodox church has always played a key role in politics.

And even Stalin didn't dare totally eradicating the church.

So even when the Soviets declared themselves atheists, Russia was still in essence a Christian power. And look how little time it took for the church to regain it's prominent place in Russia.
Permalink Send private email Erik Springelkamp 
July 22nd, 2007 7:43pm
So you consider the invasion of afghanistan beginning in 1979 as more Russian, and therefore Christian, than Soviet?

I basically believe what Peter said which doesn't single out these koreans for any special treatment as christians beyond what they get for being agents of satan.
Permalink lz 
July 22nd, 2007 7:49pm
Don't forget the Persians, Indians, Greeks, Sassanids, Arabs, Mongols, Moguls (Uzbek Persians), Tajiks (Uzbek Turks) and Kalashnikov-carrying Arabs again.
Permalink second but to Fertile Crescent 
July 22nd, 2007 8:39pm
> So you consider the invasion of afghanistan beginning in 1979 as more Russian, and therefore Christian, than Soviet?

Yes.

Russia's game about Afghanistan is much older than the Soviet Union. In the 19th century the Russian Empire grew to border the area. This prompted the British to occupy the country, in order to stop the expansion of Russia.

During the 20th century the influence of Russia grew in Afghanistan, mainly because the Afghans didn't feel supported by the West. Until the involvement of the CIA in the late 1970's this influence was regarded rather benign.

Although the Afghans fought Alexander hard when he conquered them, the Macedonians stayed there and today the Afghans are proud of that past. There are still Greek words in both of their main languages.

The Mongols also came and stayed for a long time, with descendants making the region the centre of their power.
This way they also became an intrinsic part of the country's history.

Persians, and all other neighbouring people, have relative native tribes in Afghanistan, so their involvement in Afghan politics has been natural and is quite different from the English, Russian and American invasions.
Permalink Send private email Erik Springelkamp 
July 23rd, 2007 4:51am
I'm all for carving Afghanistan into chunks to be affixed to the relevant neighbour - from Pakistan clear round to China.

Gets rid of an inconvenient border.

http://countrystudies.us/afghanistan/130.htm
Permalink trollop 
July 23rd, 2007 8:55am
> This way they also became an intrinsic part of the country's history.

The Russians tried to become an intrinsic part of Afghan history. And they're closer neighbors than Mongolia.

Basically, the problem with the Russian, British and American invasions in contrast to the others, is their lack of success and/or force.
Permalink Benny Franklin 
July 23rd, 2007 9:12am
> The Russians tried to become an intrinsic part of Afghan history. And they're closer neighbors than Mongolia.

Timoer Lenk, the great conqueror of the second wave of the Mongols, had his power base just over the border in Samarkand, Oezbekistan.

Also, he had a great Muslim attitude.
Permalink Send private email Erik Springelkamp 
July 23rd, 2007 9:29am
> Gets rid of an inconvenient border.

Uhm, I think the tribal areas of Pakistan would rather be part of Afghanistan than the other way around.

This area has long been contested by the Afghan kings.
Permalink Send private email Erik Springelkamp 
July 23rd, 2007 9:32am
>I'm all for carving Afghanistan into chunks to be affixed to the relevant neighbour - from Pakistan clear round to China.
>Uhm, I think the tribal areas of Pakistan would rather be part of Afghanistan than the other way around.
>This area has long been contested by the Afghan kings.

The Durand Line is a so-called treaty that gives about half of Afghanistan to what is now Pakistan, and includes the Waziri and Balochi areas. That treaty has been denied as a forgery by every Afghani government including the one that allegedly signed it. Part of the reason that ISI spends so much effort in destabilizing Afghanistan is to prevent Afghanistan from regaining the disputed territories, which would make Pakistan less than half the size it is now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durand_Line

http://www.afghanistans.com/Information/History/Durandline.htm
Light gray is area that would be returned from Pakistan to Afghanistan.
Permalink Peter 
July 23rd, 2007 9:45am
Well there's no need to force them to be in either of you allow the two bits of Pushtunistan to merge:

http://www.ciaonet.org/cbr/cbr00/video/cbr_ctd/cbr_ctd_53a.html

Might set off a bit of a chain reaction though :(
Permalink trollop 
July 23rd, 2007 9:49am
I think part of the essence of Imperialism is the desire to carve up other people's countries.

And I see a lot of that here at CoT.
Permalink Send private email Erik Springelkamp 
July 23rd, 2007 10:04am
It's such fun.
Permalink trollop 
July 23rd, 2007 10:26am

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