Nobody likes to be called a dummy by a dummy.

workout approaches

there seem to be a lot of different approaches and theories as to the best workout strategies.

I have been following a plan where I have been doing 3 gym sessions, focussed mostly on resistance training. Each workout focusses heavily on several areas (say, chest, triceps, calves) so that each week each area gets hit hard once. I'd do whatever exercises until I could only do about 4 reps. On other days I'd generally go and run for about 20 minutes to half an hour.

The idea behind this is that you work a muscle group hard and then give it a full week to recover, also not to do cardio burn stuff too close to when doing muscle building.

I broke rhythm a few weeks as I was travelling a bit and then got some stomach bug that laid me out for a few days, now I'm looking at changing my schedule. It still suits to do 3 gym visits and work out at home or outside.

I read through some of the links skarky put up, and some of it looks cool. I'm quite tempted by this guys videos and books and stuff : http://www.trainforstrength.com I like the idea of being able to do more without all the gym gear at home too, it's handy when travelling. At home I already have a bar for doing pullups/chinups, and plenty of space.

So I'm trying to figure out how to put all this together and get maximum benefit - ie, lose some fat, build strength. Oh yeah - I count stretching as a pretty important part of the deal too.

damn, too many options, confusing.

they have some different workout classes at the gym, maybe I'll hit some of those for some variety.
Permalink $-- 
July 23rd, 2007 8:32am
you can also supplement your workout with "power yoga" exercises while on the road.  i used to think you needed a pullup bar to work out your lats without weights, but it turns out i was wrong.  your body can create its own resistance quite well.

there are some theories out there that say you only need to work a muscle group once every 10-14 days.  however, i think this is more effective when you've reached a sizeable amount of muscle mass.
Permalink Kenny 
July 23rd, 2007 9:20am
What's an upper body pull exercise that doesn't use a pullup bar, or at least a resistance band?
Permalink strawdog soubriquet 
July 23rd, 2007 9:38am
shoulders = handstand type exercises.

lower lats + triceps = seated lifts (where you start and the ground and work your way up into a standing position with your arms).

lats + bicepts = lots of seated resistance moves that involve a pulling motion around your core.  it's kinda hard to describe with text.

do some lookups on "ashtanga".

eg.

http://www.absolutelyashtanga.com/yoga_5.html
Permalink Kenny 
July 23rd, 2007 10:02am
**note: you can get a pretty good workout with beginner moves as well.  i usually sweat like a pig and am completely exausted whenever i do a level 1 class, and i've been weight training for 7 years.
Permalink Kenny 
July 23rd, 2007 10:04am
cheers Kenny.

note to self - date yoga chick ...
Permalink $-- 
July 23rd, 2007 10:24am
I think before you pick a work-out approach, you should pick a very specific goal.  Weight loss, gaining strength are too vague, for example.

I think it is better to say: "I want to be able to run 5 miles at X pace", or "I want to do 50 wide-grip chin-ups", or "I want all six muscles of my abdominals to show". It is okay to have more than one goal, of course.

The reason to get specific is because work-out options are varied and provide varied results.

Also, doing weight training with the typical 3-10 sets per bodypart 3x a week gets adapted to pretty easily by your body.

If a certain "look" is important to you, remember that form follows function.  If you can do 100 chin-ups, your lats are probably going to be a lot bigger.

While most work-out programs provide a bit of fat loss and maybe some strength added, they won't make you decidedly different from the masses.

To become super-fit and distinguish yourself, you have to train like the super fit.  Super fit people do not merely lift weights in a progression from week to week.  They opt to challenge their bodies and force them out of their adaptation.  Not everyone has this goal, I realize.
Permalink Send private email sharkfish 
July 23rd, 2007 10:55am
Right now I am just concerned with establishing the habit of daily exercise.  I built the weight machine right next to my bed so when I get up in the morning there's no avoiding it - it's *right there*.  Get up, do a bit, go shower.

I'll work on pushing the limits once the habit is installed and I think my joints can take it.  My knees need some reinforcement, and I don't want to screw them up like I did a couple years ago.
Permalink Aaron 
July 23rd, 2007 11:03am
ok. so what's the workout schedule to get that yoga chick ... ?
Permalink $-- 
July 23rd, 2007 1:43pm
First I should sign up for yoga...
Permalink Aaron 
July 23rd, 2007 2:44pm
I thought pullups lengthen your triceps and shorten your biceps, while pushups do the opposite?

Also: a handstand pushup is not in my immediate future. I've been trying for a week, and it's goddamn hard.

Yoga looks great for girls (chck out the shoulders and arms on the gals), but that yoga instructor guy, the bearded one on the beach, doesn't look too hot.
Permalink strawdog soubriquet 
July 23rd, 2007 2:53pm
When I was a teenager I could do 10 handstand pushups in a row.  I haven't tried in years.  Maybe I will after work.
Permalink Aaron 
July 23rd, 2007 3:44pm
heh. I actually checked out some sites for yoga classes in my area, but the whole scene looks a bit up tight to me.

I can't stand those fuckers who make out they're all  so into eastern religion, and insist in shoving their meditative prowess down your throat. It's so fake ass, and the real people generally don't do it.

Anyhow, I prefer my exercise to be a bit more sweaty and to the point.

The old guy with the beard in those pics may not look hot, but I wouldn't mind be able to pull some of his moves though.
Permalink $-- 
July 23rd, 2007 3:53pm
>>I can't stand those fuckers who make out they're all  so into eastern religion, and insist in shoving their meditative prowess down your throat. It's so fake ass, and the real people generally don't do it.

agreed when it comes to men.  i think they're just trying to get laid (though at times, it looks like with other men).

it's not so bad with hot female instructors, tho...
Permalink Kenny 
July 23rd, 2007 5:13pm
it irritates me with females too. Maybe even more. It's so much about "look at me, I'm all fucking spiritual ..."

I travelled and played music with a top notch Indian musician a bit. The guy has been a devout Hindu all his life. We became pretty good friends, as much as that is possible given the cultural differences, he invited me to his music school in India (I still have to take that up, time time time ...), shared rooms when gigging out of town once or twice. I'd wake up in the morning, I'd been out to party the night before - he'd be sitting there praying quietly. But the guy never once - *never* - mentioned anything much about his faith or tried in any way to impose it. It just shines through in his nature.

So I really need some insecure failed-model-type giving it big about how much she learned at the ashram, blah blah. Not.
Permalink $-- 
July 23rd, 2007 5:34pm

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