Reconciling assholes for nearly a decade.

Deep scan DRM coming to net backbones

All your packets belong to us:

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070613-att-willing-to-spy-for-nsa-mpaa-and-riaa.html
Permalink Practical Economist 
July 23rd, 2007 3:03pm
And before you know it there will be a gap in the market for a competing telecom company to offer "DRM free traffic"!

It will never fly...
Permalink Bluebeard 
July 23rd, 2007 3:17pm
Who are you more scared of: NSA, or the *IAA organizations?
Permalink Send private email xampl 
July 23rd, 2007 3:34pm
Maybe not, because AT&T owns critical backbones. Get a couple more companies on board and you can control 75% of the backbone.

Question for those not worried about this. How are you going to use the internet without touching the backbone at some point.
Permalink Practical Economist 
July 23rd, 2007 3:34pm
Wait til corporate America figures out this means "we break your VPNs"...
Permalink Aaron 
July 23rd, 2007 3:42pm
> we break your VPNs"...

How will it do that? Encryption will be the way to screw these systems.
Permalink son of parnas 
July 23rd, 2007 5:36pm
They can't allow that though, because their system would be broken then.
Permalink Send private email JoC 
July 23rd, 2007 5:37pm
Sounds like a bunch of hot air and public pandering. They may as well pay some lip service to the notion if they can get big entities like *IAA's on their side.

We do need another cold war. I suppose many of us aren't in bad seats for a technological arms race.
Permalink Send private email JoC 
July 23rd, 2007 5:39pm
> They can't allow that though,

They don't have a choice. No company will send clear text period.
Permalink son of parnas 
July 23rd, 2007 5:41pm
Hence the breakage?

It's all just a power-drunken pass at the *IAAs anyways.

After she spreads her legs for Ma Bell's red-headed bastard step child, they won't get so much as a phone call.
Permalink Send private email JoC 
July 23rd, 2007 6:25pm
Exactly.  You can either allow VPN and forget about tracking packets, or you can track packets and disallow VPN.  Not both.  So basically AT&T is promising to break VPNs.
Permalink Aaron 
July 23rd, 2007 11:09pm
"Approved" VPNs would function - all you'd need is 100 identity points to set one up and hand over a copy of the keys to the regulators.
Permalink trollop 
July 23rd, 2007 11:20pm
Right.  And large companies would go right along with that.

In reality, they'd just start laying cable of their own that never touched the AT&T backbone.  There are several fully capable of it, and would do it if it meant maintaining communication between their branches.  Start with banks.
Permalink Aaron 
July 24th, 2007 12:10am
> just start laying cable of their own that never touched the AT&T backbon

It's a monopoly business so it's unlikely anyone could do this. You just need to do what Google did, buy dark fibre and create your own network.
Permalink son of parnas 
July 24th, 2007 12:15am
Cable television laid a lot of wire, same as telephone companies, and power companies.  There has to be a way to lay wire, and I suspect banks have the money and will to make it happen if it comes to that.
Permalink Aaron 
July 24th, 2007 1:05am
But yes, buying/leasing dark fiber is probably a better solution.

Hell, building a network of wireless towers could work, too.
Permalink Aaron 
July 24th, 2007 1:06am
Thre are plenty of private WANS totally disconnected or fiercely firewalled from the Internet running on top of the general carriers. Most governments rely on them, as do banks. Sprint, IBM (and several others) purchase bandwidth for resale as a service to their clients.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_area_network

What's new is the carriers wanting to move up the food chain.
Permalink trollop 
July 24th, 2007 3:50am
If you build anything on top of the carriers it's not private. It all flows through carrier switches which all have taps running off into NSA storage and analysis systems. Anything over the spectrum is recordable.

You would have to run a private cable between locations for it to be safe, and even that can be tapped without you knowing.
Permalink son of parnas 
July 24th, 2007 11:43am
This can be circumvented with encrypted P2P traffic. uTorrent already supports encryption for torrents.

Of course, that kind of countermeasure is unnecessary. By the looks of things this is a large scale government IT project created for regulatory reasons and having to do some pretty clever pattern recognition.

And that's why it's destined to fail.
Permalink Send private email Colm 
July 24th, 2007 7:04pm

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