Tax the wealthy. Problem solved.

Could xtians actually remember they follow christ, not bush?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/6917947.stm - Could Christian vote desert Republicans?

<quote>
"We want to build a culture of life - but that includes the vulnerable outside the womb, as well as the vulnerable inside the womb.

"We've had too long a time where we make people who disagree with us into enemies," he added.

"I think that's not Christ-like or even intelligent. This whole thing is not a struggle over ideology, it's a struggle over power."
</quote>

Nah, I don't think so either.
Permalink son of parnas 
July 28th, 2007 11:13am
Carter got over half the evangelical vote in his hey day.

That's when Republicans were like Rockefellers. Kept their religion and their purses close to the chest.
Permalink strawdog soubriquet 
July 28th, 2007 11:37am
Carter lives his faith - he doesn't jam it down everyone else's throat.

Most of the power brokers of the Christian Right are just pretending to be religious, IMO.  They use it to manipulate the real believers.
Permalink AMerrickanGirl 
July 28th, 2007 11:39am
"Carter lives his faith - he doesn't jam it down everyone else's throat."

Heretic.

Didn't the Republicans mock him for the "lust in my heart" comment?

BTW, how many "devout" Christians today would sit for a Playboy interview? How many Presidential candidates?

How far have we fallen?
Permalink Send private email Philo 
July 28th, 2007 12:52pm
"Didn't the Republicans mock him for the "lust in my heart" comment?"

I hope no christians would do that though.
Permalink Rick Zeng 
July 28th, 2007 2:11pm
>Carter lives his faith - he doesn't jam it down everyone else's throat.

The Clintons were the same. They were actually pretty hardcore Christians, which is scary, but they didn't bring it up in public life. Bush is the reverse.
Permalink Send private email Colm 
July 28th, 2007 2:28pm
So...the last 2 Democrats we had were quietly Christian, and...

Sigh...
Permalink Aaron 
July 28th, 2007 8:11pm
Sorry, this started in 1980, when Reagan courted the Conservative Christian vote, the 700 Club made Pat Robertson a political figure, and Jerry Falwell decided his Southern Baptist "Liberty University" gave him a political platform.

The resulting confusion of politics and religion has confused those Conservatives who happen to be Christian into thinking that using their religion to try to implement more moral public policy is not a prostitution of both Politics and Religion.

Karl Rove quite cynically courted this vote for Texas, and then again for the National election.  However, since then the Republican party has not followed through on their promises to these luddites (no abortion, conservative Supreme Court, repeal of the socialist Social Security, and outlawing being gay).  They've become a little disinchanted.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
July 28th, 2007 9:23pm
Plus they're starting to become dimly aware of the fact that the people they voted for may not, in fact, be motivated by core Christian values.

Only took them 7 years.
Permalink Send private email Colm 
July 28th, 2007 10:35pm
See "Kuo, David"
Permalink Full name 
July 28th, 2007 11:14pm
"The Clintons were actually pretty hardcore Christians"

True if you mean they liked to watch zoo porn movies.
Permalink Practical Economist 
July 29th, 2007 2:29am
>The Clintons were the same. They were actually pretty hardcore Christians, which is scary, but they didn't bring it up in public life. Bush is the reverse.

The Clintons went to church every Sunday, yet were painted by the right wing noise machine as infidels. Neither bush_2 nor reagan went to church except as part of some theatrical presentation (look! it goes to church!) yet were painted by the right wing noise machine as devout religious folks.

>Could xtians actually remember they follow christ, not bush?
Perhaps they could, instead they worship bush:
http://www.bushfish.org/
Permalink Peter 
July 30th, 2007 9:01am

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