Nobody likes to be called a dummy by a dummy.

Computerworld's 2006 predictions

http://www.computerworld.com/managementtopics/management/story/0,10801,107251,00.html

Bonus points to those who spot the new euphemism for layoffs.
Permalink example 
January 3rd, 2006
IT agility will be hot in 2006.
Permalink  
January 3rd, 2006
Trend for 2006: codeless development


Sign me up!
Permalink  
January 3rd, 2006
Exfoliate eh? I wonder if there's a "bottom 10% scrub" that CEOs can buy to rejuvenate tired workforces, and erase fine lines...
Permalink Andrew Cherry 
January 3rd, 2006
exfoliate. lol
Permalink Kenny 
January 3rd, 2006
Bonus points go to Andrew!
Permalink example 
January 3rd, 2006
I like this one:

"Someday, companies will no more expect to buy their employees a laptop than they would cars or clothes. In universities today, it is already assumed that students can bring whatever PC they like and that it is the school's IT systems that must adjust. What mostly prevents this from happening in large enterprises today is the heavy use of client software and its perceived advantages over pure browser-based computing. But now the use of Ajax development techniques can make any browser-based application perform like a client-server or fat client system. Just look at maps.google.com to see the sort of interaction that is possible. Over 2006, AJAX will emerge as a key enabler of the shift toward Web-based corporate applications. "
Permalink Cory Foy 
January 3rd, 2006
Wow, talk about the anti-Joel manifesto:

"Programming productivity will be dramatically improved with new tools that reduce coding to simple data entry."

Remind me never to work with for that guy!
Permalink thinker 
January 3rd, 2006
Yeah, that's been going to happen for about 20 years.
Permalink Colm O'Connor 
January 3rd, 2006
"Someday, companies will no more expect to buy their employees a laptop than they would cars or clothes"

Yeah, I want to go work for a company that tells me to bring my own computer. I also think that most companies would have an aneurysm at the though of employees having personal computers on the network that they then carry home.

What an airhead.

Philo
Permalink Philo 
January 3rd, 2006
Interestingly, even in these 'evolved' days, some companies DO rent cars for their employees -- especially upper level ones.

Not buying your employees laptops/PC's is like in the car mechanic world where a hired car mechanic brings (and maintains) his own set of Snap-On tools. In the Boeing airplane assembly world, this does not happen. In other words, if PC-driven work becomes 'blue-collar', you'll have to buy your own tools. I don't think that's going to happen.

This is a VERY different model from the office environment, where pens, pencils, pads, folers, binders, etcetera all come out of the office. And Philo is right that a completely uncontrolled laptop/PC is more of a nightmare to a company than a helpful resource.
Permalink AllanL5 
January 3rd, 2006
Reading Allan's comments, you really have to wonder WTF the moronic pundit was thinking - how is "bring your own computer to work" of any benefit to anyone except people who keep repeating "the era of the thin client is here"?

(not commenting on whether thin client is here or not - agreed that AJAX makes it more palatable; just commenting on letting tech-political desires color one's expectations beyond reason)

Philo
Permalink Philo 
January 3rd, 2006
Well, he tries to liken it to the college campuses - because we all know that network admins *flock* to work at a campus network center.

Next we'll bring our own desks. And if we're going to do that, I'm just going to work from home.

The caveat would be if there was an allowance to purchase a PC. But even then, I can't imagine the network or security guys would be happy with that.
Permalink Cory Foy 
January 3rd, 2006
I think the funniest thing is that the companies that would most like employees to bring their own computers (cheap, stingy, "let them eat cake" types) are the ones that would be most paranoid about letting them take the computers home again.

[snicker]

Philo
Permalink Philo 
January 3rd, 2006
> What mostly prevents this from happening in
> large enterprises today is the heavy use of client
> software and its perceived advantages over
> pure browser-based computing.

I guess they missed the security memo.
Permalink son of parnas 
January 3rd, 2006
The other good phrase (from the same "exfoliate" quote) was "skills pogrom".

Which makes it sound like if you don't know whatever it is they want this month, off you go to "reeducation camp" at the state unemployment office.

I'm pretty sure I wouldn't want to work with/for "Thornton A. May" anytime soon.
Permalink example 
January 3rd, 2006
Well, well, well...
http://www.ciobootcamp2005.com/thornton_may/
CIO Bootcamp. It's some kind of camp, I guess. Re-education camps, next stop!
Permalink Star Wars Kid 
January 3rd, 2006
Oh, and check it:
"Thornton May is the real deal. A daring intellectual in a business filled with fakes, Thornton encourages us -- no he FORCES us -- to sit up, pay attention and think hard about the real issues we face every day."

Seth Godin, Author of Permission Marketing

Well. If Sethy sez it, it must be true!
Permalink Star Wars Kid 
January 3rd, 2006
At least you could bring in your Mac instead of the crappy PC they give you.
Permalink Steve 
January 3rd, 2006
Yeah! Then you'd have dashboard widgets!!!
Permalink Philo 
January 3rd, 2006

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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