Dividers to the right, please.

Opensource C Hacker versus the Wallstreet Programmer

http://www.wallstreetprogrammer.com/2005/11/30/experienced-programmers-starting-on-wall-street/

I read this and wondered.  Would a wallstreet programmer spit in the face of the 20 year old college student hacker or that  60 year old bored researcher turned opensource project lead?

What do you think, could you compare the skill level of the opensource hacker (the guys that maintain a lot of the projects out there) to a wallstreet programmer?

I work sort of indirectly with former Wallstreet/Financial managers and developers... I would say they are pretty slick and all about the money, productivity, professionalism.  I don't really think it is safe to compare the two because they live in different worlds, but I will say that developers that work for money and deal with money are pretty serious about their jobs.
Permalink Send private email Bot Berlin 
January 27th, 2006 9:28pm
A little more on this:

An opensource developer (for example on the initial release) can throw some crap together and pretty much get away with it.  Early linux (great project by the way) only worked on minix had only one developer, time and love of the project made the project shine.  But it took a lot of evolutionary growth to get it to the point it is today.

I am sure the trader applications have to work flawlessly out of the box.  And have to work on a every configuration, tested for a million users and crap like that.  Have to be section508 (for the disabled) compliant, translated to 50 languages, etc.
Permalink Send private email Bot Berlin 
January 27th, 2006 9:56pm
Linux never ran on Minix. Torvalds wrote it as an independant project.

http://www.linux10.org/history/
Permalink g 
January 27th, 2006 10:05pm
Compiled on minix.

Sorry.
Permalink Send private email Bot Berlin 
January 27th, 2006 10:06pm
Youda man, if it was Minux!  ;-P

his latest:
http://www.wallstreetprogrammer.com/2006/01/

I like that he talks about Linux network programming.  I am at the point where I am just now getting to network programming, but it's always been the part that's most attracted me.

I'm about to read of all that fork() and socket stuff with Perl on Linux.  Time to build a little server.  :-)

Yeah, his stuff is right there in real time.  Hard to beat for excitement value, but you can still be a real programmer and do other stuff, like AJAX, NotBerlin.  You don't have to prove anything to me.  :-)
Permalink LinuxOrBust 
January 27th, 2006 10:18pm
sorry LoB, this isn't a dig but...

how on earth do you work in the computer industry and 8not* know networking styff?  what kind of work do you do?
Permalink Send private email FullNameRequired 
January 28th, 2006 12:58am
I've never programmed that stuff.  I know the network stack, sockets, IPC concepts, OS kernel concepts and features.

I haven't programmed that kinda stuff though, even the simple stuff.  I mean, yeah, simple like web-scrape and POP server stuff, but that's the extent.

Do you guys run those examples out of the book and move on or what?  I don't believe it because I am seeing WAY too many posts on say, JOS, from people who are purely web programmers, and I do mean web-page, DB driven apps.

I know how to program OO, and references, and tie in Perl, (and CGI, of course) that puts me up over classic VBscript ASP 3.0 right there.  ;-)
Permalink LinuxOrBust 
January 28th, 2006 3:45am
Oh, work do I do, I am still trying to break in. 

I went on a job interview Thursday and Friday.  It was funny, I could overhear the guy after me getting interviewed while I was taking a technical test.  That's how I feel about it as a careermove, take a number.

It's a little frustrating at times regarding anything IT'ish because the interviewers always want to be insistent about which "job" I learned something at.  Today, I was actually at an interview where I had done it all before, more or less, from a previous job, but I was still just a number.
Permalink LinuxOrBust 
January 28th, 2006 4:36am
I have been trying to get to New York for years.  I may just jump and screw the planning things out bit.

But, I am mostly a java guy, I don't know if I can pick up C++ to the extent I need to... hmm.
Permalink Send private email Bot Berlin 
January 28th, 2006 2:00pm
Man, other languages you just learn the language and you are done.  With Java, the language isn't supposed to be too hard, but you have to learn all of these side-technologies, all of these plugins and servers for it.

At least with C++, or even Perl for that matter, when you are done learning the language you are basically done.  Sure, there are libraries to learn eventually, but that's any language.
Permalink LinuxOrBust 
January 28th, 2006 6:03pm
"I haven't programmed that kinda stuff though, even the simple stuff.  I mean, yeah, simple like web-scrape and POP server stuff, but that's the extent."

always amazes me.  I guess I see so much of it because Im a contractor...clients want all sorts of stupid things so you end up being a bit of a jack of all trades, master of none.

"Do you guys run those examples out of the book and move on or what?"

sorry, I dont understand this question?

"I don't believe it because I am seeing WAY too many posts on say, JOS, from people who are purely web programmers, and I do mean web-page, DB driven apps."

<g> I try and pretend that I believe its all programming.  ultimately of course its not.  bloody html ninnies and scripting lightweights.

"I know how to program OO, and references, and tie in Perl, (and CGI, of course) that puts me up over classic VBscript ASP 3.0 right there.  ;-)"

of course it does.  I did some applescript just the other day so I think I lose a few points....
Permalink Send private email FullNameRequired 
January 29th, 2006 2:03am

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other topics: January, 2006 Other topics: January, 2006 Recent topics Recent topics