Reconciling assholes for nearly a decade.

Soda supercooling

The soft-drink machine downstairs dispenses the 20 fl.oz. bottles (which I like more than cans), and the machine must have it's thermostat set too low. The contents are liquid when you buy it, but once you open the bottle, the top two inches or so immediately turn into ice.

If you don't keep an eye on it, it'll form a plug that allows pressure to build up underneath, until it suddenly gives way.

Result: a Diet Dr. Pepper volcano on your desk.
Permalink example 
January 3rd, 2006
If the CO2 is sufficently pressuarized it will cause the soda to cool noticably when its released. The expanding gas will absorb heat from the environment. (Which is how most cooling devices work afaik)
So, it might be a combination of overpressurized bottles and a too high setting on the cooler.
Permalink Eric Debois 
January 3rd, 2006
Thanks Eric - Didn't think about the CO2 cooling effect.
Permalink example 
January 3rd, 2006
When I was in Cali, a coworker asked me to bring back some Dr Peppers. He really liked the stuff, but it's not available in Estonia.

So I just grabbed like five cans from the office fridge before I left work the day I was flying home. Made it nicely all the way back to Tallinn and spent four days in a suitcase until I went back to Tartu, during which trip one of the cans inexplicably burst and soaked the entire contents of my bag.
Permalink Flasher T 
January 3rd, 2006
Oh, and stuff is much better out of a can than out of a plastic bottle. Not as good as out of a glass bottle though.

I wonder why glass bottles with metal caps are easy to make completely airtight, and plastic ones aren't?
Permalink Flasher T 
January 3rd, 2006
I don't know if it's the cap, or the bottle itself. I think the PET (polyethylene-terephthalate) plastic is slightly porous, but have no proof.

But I agree. Drinking a cold drink from a glass bottle is the best. :-)
Permalink example 
January 3rd, 2006
Why do they still use glass bottles for Coke in a lot of other countries? Just havn't updated the production facility yet or something?
Permalink Phil 
January 3rd, 2006
I've heard a couple of theories about it the switch to plastic.

1) Fear of germs from the previous customer, despite being washed in super hot sudsy water.

2) Economics -- the glass bottles cost money to be returned, washed, and then refilled & capped. The same theory says it costs too much to melt them down & reblow them (the melting would presumably take care of the germ problem).

My money is on #2. Why not put the burden of recycling the single-use plastic bottles on the consumer?
Permalink example 
January 3rd, 2006
Glass can be washed locally and re-used. If you don't have the plastic factories we Americans have, or have to ship your plastic pellets from overseas, it can make it more expensive to manufacture 'virgin' plastic bottles than it is to wash the glass ones.
Permalink AllanL5 
January 3rd, 2006
Washed? I've never lived in a state that does deposits on bottles. Breakage is one big advantage. But why is beer still in glass bottles if either of those theories are true?
Permalink Phil 
January 3rd, 2006
Consumer acceptance, maybe?
Permalink example 
January 3rd, 2006
They wash bottles when you return them? I'd just assumed they turned them into chips, melted them down and made new bottles out of them.
Permalink MarkTAW 
January 3rd, 2006
Not in Africa. That's my understanding, anyway.

And the 1960's coke bottles used to be made really thick, so that they wouldn't break in the wash process.

So I'm told, anyway.
Permalink AllanL5 
January 3rd, 2006
Polyester exudes some nasty smelling stuff on aging that has a deliterious effect on some foods. Some other polymers are also a problem.

Back in the day, I worked for a chemical company that experimented with storing liquors in polyester bottles. Not good. Apparently the alcohol extracted some of the nasties into the booze.
Permalink Misanthrope 
January 3rd, 2006
it's hard to find returnable bottles in the us, but they're common elsewhere.

the question is, do they really wash the bottles, and if they do, is it really with hot water?

(in europe, i'd guess yes. but in india?)
Permalink mb 
January 4th, 2006
I used to make considerable pocket money taking back the empties, a whole old penny a bottle. This was even more profitable taking the empties from behind the offie which had already been surrendered and taking them back in to claim another penny on them.
Permalink Simon Lucy 
January 4th, 2006
There is a big TCCC plant in Tallinn, serves most of the Baltics. Most of their product is in plastic bottles, but they do still produce small quantities of Coke in 0.25L glass. Very hard to find in retail, you really need to go to the supplier for them.

Oh, and there's a mandatory deposit on bottles here. You used to be able to return them before as well, for a market price - anywhere from 0.10EEK on glass bottles and cans to 0.80EEK and more on glass; now the consumers pay a deposit that's added to the purchase price and the shops are obligated to buy back the bottles for the deposit. 0.50EEK on small plastic bottles, 1EEK on large plastic and all glass bottles.
Permalink Flasher T 
January 4th, 2006

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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