Reconciling assholes for nearly a decade.

Why I like Windows stuff...

So I'm running an Exchange Server at home for various reasons. Ran out of space on the disk I was keeping the Exchange database on.

Did a bit of research, found out that moving the location of the data stores consists of:

Right-click, Properties
Database tab.
Set the new location with a "Browse" button
Click "Apply"

Exchange asks if you're sure, Dave, then dismounts the database, copies the files, and remounts it. Done. Took two minutes.

(Setting up Outlook Web Access, including generating the certificate, took fifteen minutes)

I know - I'm buried in WindowsWorld, so that's what I know. Maybe that's the state of the art across the board. All I know is I'm happy it's not like it was (everywhere) five years ago. :)

Philo
Permalink Philo 
August 10th, 2005
Philo,

That's cool. Even if you are at Microsoft, it is cool to hear when stuff just works.

How much does it cost to run an Exchange server at home?

I personally use WindowsXP at work and Gentoo Linux at home, but I always like to hear when the right things are made easy.
Permalink Jared 
August 10th, 2005
Why do you run an exchange server at home?
Permalink Colm O'Connor 
August 10th, 2005
...and how'd you run out of disk space? (I assume it's not from too many emails)
Permalink Almost H. Anonymous 
August 10th, 2005
Not MS related... I just ran Ghost after installing a bunch of software and configuring a new machine.

The image creation failed.

Now I get something to the effect of:

DISK ERROR, PLEASE INSERT SYSTEM DISK

Argh....
Permalink I am Jack's infinite id 
August 10th, 2005
If you buy Microsoft stuff at the employee store-front there's a discount. It might be why Philo has Exchange server at home. Exchange is excellent, but I suspect some people with a ISV or a homenet will either 1) run postfix on linux or 2) some runner-up in the GUI-based windows-only mail server market that cost way less. The key is doing without Windows Server 2000/2003, because the minute you use them you'll have to pay through the nose due to licensing discrimination for stuff like anti-virus and end-node firewalls.
Permalink Li-fan Chen 
August 10th, 2005
Sounds good Philo ;-)
Permalink Li-fan Chen 
August 10th, 2005
I tried setting up a mail server once using linux in order to consolidate the five email addresses I had, and provide me with a server with enough megabytes to store them all, as well as a reasonable web based mail client (I used Groupwise... yech).

Unfortunately, I misconfigured the server and ended up spamming every person who had sent me an email in the last three years. I gave up after that, and shortly after gmail appeared to my delight.

I still can't figure out where postfix found an SMTP server that would let it spam everyone.
Permalink Colm O'Connor 
August 10th, 2005
Exhchange has improved then. Domino you can move from server to server pretty much with xcopy deployment - UNLIKE .net.
Permalink MeatNote 
August 10th, 2005
Sorry to hear Colm.
Permalink Li-fan Chen 
August 10th, 2005
Colm,

I had a friend at collge who did the same thing. All of his mail was sent through the schools SMTP server, and the server did nothing to stop it. The administrators, on the other hand, turned off his port after the damage was done and it took a week to get back on the 'net.

It's really emberassing, but can happen to the best of us.
Permalink Ben Atkin 
August 10th, 2005
There are some things that are good about having a leviathan mail box file (masquerading as a kind of Jet database), like being able to move it relatively easily, then there are god awful things about it like when it corrupts and someone has over a Gb as their mail store.

Then there's the statutory wait when bringing down a server that has Exchange on it whilst Exchange deigns to accept that the server really is going down (this might be fixed in 2003 or Exchange, I really don't care its a vile mail server on the whole).
Permalink Simon Lucy 
August 11th, 2005
Well, he might be running a Sstandard edition Small Business Server 2003 which would have cost $599 list price. You could probably get it for far less bundeled with hardware (At Dell, that would be around $300), or if he gets it from the company store I'm guessing this would be even less.
Permalink Just me (Sir to you) 
August 11th, 2005
Work with me here guys, I am a little slow. Dell gives software discounts with their server products? I am a noob in this space and could use a good learning. What else do they give discounts on and how much, I'd love to learn more.
Permalink Li-fan Chen 
August 11th, 2005
Nice troll Li-Fan, but I'll bite anyway.

First of all, it is not the same product. You could install the retail version on any computer you fancy (no, I don't mean more than one at the same time), and even resell it (I think), whereas the Dell OEM version is license tied to the particular machine you buy it with.
Second, Dell would probably get a volume discount from Microsoft, and Dell might choose to share it (partly) with the buyer.
Third, Since it is a bundle, you can't know which subitem is "discounted", since it does not give an individual breakdown of the component pricings. For all we know they drop an extra $300 on the hardware if you go with the SBS sku.

The only point I was trying to make here was that no, Exchange 2003 for the home is not expensive at all, even if you are not a MS employee. Your biggest problem is probably going to be finding a broadband provider that does allow you to host your own mailserver on a residential plan.
Permalink Just me (Sir to you) 
August 12th, 2005
"the Dell OEM version is license tied to the particular machine you buy it with"

I believe that in most of the EU that's an unenforcable clause, and you're well within your rights to buy a machine from Dell, install the software on a different machine, and ditch the hardware. It's covered under "first sale" doctrine, and although software companies have claimed the software isn't sold to you it's just "licensed" the EU have tended to say "piss off". US case law is contradictory on the issue, but in cases such as Softman v Adobe and Novell v CPU Distribution the courts have ruled that bundled software is still subject to the first sale even if the EULA prohibits it; however, there are conflicting results (Davidson & Associates v Gateway) so it's still unclear exactly where you stand.
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 12th, 2005
Oh, and IANAL. :)
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 12th, 2005
Also, there might be little hurdles like the customized installer checking wether the machine you are trying to install on is a Dell.
Permalink Just me (Sir to you) 
August 12th, 2005

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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