Oops, 7 Days. Hey look I don't update on weekends.

"Why I am getting out of the Marines"

http://chicago.craigslist.org/about/best/wdc/118782492.html

whoa. That sounds real.
Permalink sharkfish 
January 20th, 2006
Yep.

When I was driving ships, the CO's standing orders included "Never assume the watch if you are tired, ill, or otherwise unable to perform your duties. If you feel you are not capable of standing a vigilant watch, notify the watch officer for a replacement"

We thought that was so funny - "Captain, I can't take bridge watch because I'm too tired" (Translated: "Captain, I don't want to get promoted; can you take care of that for me?")

Yes, that 1,100 foot long floating airport is being driven by someone who's slept four hours in the last three days.

Philo
Permalink Philo 
January 20th, 2006
I recall the language from my Navy days, so the post has the ring of truth and aligns with my personal experience (although it was so long ago I don't remember much) egads! It was 12 years ago when I was last a Navy girl.
Permalink sharkfish 
January 20th, 2006
But that's always been the Marines, as far as I know. That's what they are, the guys that do more with less.

Read about the Korean War. Guys get dropped off a truck to defend a line in subzero temperatures where the ground is frozen. In the middle of the night you get swarmed by human-wave attacks and pee on your rifle so that it doesn't freeze.

That's the Marines, did he not know that??
Permalink LinuxOrBust 
January 21st, 2006
"In the middle of the night you get swarmed by human-wave attacks and pee on your rifle so that it doesn't freeze."

Yeah. But should he be happy when we decide he only needs ten bullets due to budget cuts?

Philo
Permalink Philo 
January 21st, 2006
No, and that is why he didn't re-enlist.
Permalink LinuxOrBust 
January 21st, 2006
Yep, sounds real.

That 12-on, 12-off -- that's not unusual, or not supportable. You can do that forever. That's 12 hours of work, 8 hours of sleep, and 4 hours of eating, relaxing, watching TV. There's nothing else to do at sea.

But the Navy does have rules about how tired a pilot is allowed to be, how 'down' the planes can be before you stop flying them. They really-really-really HATE getting our people killed.

A trained pilot represents a huge investement by the military. The plane he's flying is another large investement. So they hate losing that because of poor maintenance or fatigue.

What Philo didn't say about driving a ship on 4-hours sleep was -- if the driver runs over a ship, the Captain of the ship is Responsible. It's his career on the line. Sure, the driver of the ship has career problems, too, but the Captain's Navy career may be over.

This encourages the 'higher-ups' to act responsibly, unlike the higher-up in the referred to letter. Getting people killed in preventable, avoidable accidents reflects REALLY badly on your future military career -- even if you ARE a Marine.
Permalink AllanL5 
January 21st, 2006
"Yeah. But should he be happy when we decide he only needs ten bullets due to budget cuts?"

What astonishes me about this sort of thing is the sheer amount of money it seems to take to run a cut-down, sawn-off, budget restricted armed forces which can't afford to buy anything.

Take us (the Brits) for example. Our armed forces cost a stunning, gobsmacking amount of money and apparently what we get for that is people in the field numbered in 5 figures if we're lucky and they can't have boots, body armour, working rifles, working radios or working tanks because all of those things are "too expensive".

Somewhere, there is a very large hole in the ground that someone is filling up with taxpayer fivers.
Permalink Katie Lucas 
January 21st, 2006
The military supply system is full of middle-men, which consume money but add little value.

So far as software, my understanding is that contracts are let to the very large defense firms, who then sub-contract it out to smaller firms. Who then sub-contract it out to yet smaller companies. Eventually the amount of money gets too small to repeat that operation, and that company is the one that gets stuck with actually writing the code. Everyone above them just takes a cut for stuffing the status reports in a new envelope before forwarding them (plus the invoice) on.
Permalink example 
January 21st, 2006
Nope - contracts are generally 1, 2, or 3-step.

One-step - one prime contractor. There are a number of these.
Two-step - one prime who subcontracts out to smaller boutiques.
Mixed in with two-step above is is the occasional hiring of independent contractors (three-step)

Philo
Permalink Philo 
January 21st, 2006

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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