A bunch of cunts, mostly in the Australian sense. Except that one guy.

BBC to transmit TV over net...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/tv_and_radio/4187036.stm

Sorry guys UK only apparently.
Permalink a cynic writes... 
August 26th, 2005
And not the cricket as they don't have the rights.

And Harmison is stumped
Permalink Simon Lucy 
August 26th, 2005
I think the popularity of this move will rely quite a lot on how they implement it. If it was just a case of "whatever's on TV right now is also available on the internet" then I can't see it catching on, but if they provided a "watch again" service (akin to their current "listen again" thing for radio -- pretty much anything broadcast in the past seven days is available in case you missed it) then it'd be genius. (And even better if the shows were downloadable rather than streamed, and DRM free would make the whole thing perfect. Never going to happen, obviously, but a man can dream...)

On the downside, geographic location of IP addresses isn't an exact science so there may be a lot of false negatives and positives (which may adversely affect (the other sort of) IP licensing issues), plus they use RealPlayer for everything, and it sucks. :)
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 26th, 2005
From the article it looks like it will be limited to certain programmes, some of which will be available on the Internet before appearing on TV. You just know that it won't be exactly what we'd like though - some sort of rubbish viewer, no way to download it to watch over or save an entire series, poor quality.

At least it should be free to stream - we have paid our license fee already after all.
Permalink qwe 
August 26th, 2005
Well the Mighty Boosh goes up a week before it's on BBC3 and they plan to do that with some things, they're developing their own OSS compression system (called Dirac I believe) which is based and last I heard they were looking at BitTorrent.

I suspect it will be "watch again" with possibly some archive stuff going up for download (cf. podcasting Today Programme Interviews).
Permalink a cynic writes... 
August 26th, 2005
They're already doing the "some stuff on t'internet first" scheme, but the article gave the impression that, in addition to expanding that further, plans are afoot to get all their stuff broadcast on the web in the future.
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 26th, 2005
I think it's a "one step at time" sort of thing.
Permalink a cynic writes... 
August 26th, 2005
The dream would be some sort of viewer that can be set to record it on set times like a computer based TiVo. Is there any software that can do that kind of thing already?
Permalink qwe 
August 26th, 2005
My Audigy2 came with an app that would allow you to record audio streams at pre-determined times, so I wouldn't be at all surprised if there were an equivalent for video streams.
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 26th, 2005
Yet another reason to move to banner and product placement instead of interrupting ads. Be nice if they went with downloadable DRM'd content, too. (I hated the idea of DRM content at first, but to be dreadfully honest, I haven't had a problem with MSN Music songs - they've played everywhere I've needed them to)

Actually, what am I saying? The shows are paid for by advertising - MORE EXPOSURE = BETTER, right? Plus shows over the 'net could be considered loss leaders for series - watch a few episode via download and you might start watching them as they air.

AND - instant viewership feedback.

All visionary, of course.

So they won't do it.

Philo
Permalink Philo 
August 26th, 2005
Er, the BBCs shows are NOT paid for by advertising. We, the British viewing public, pay for them directly out of out own pockets via the TV license...
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 26th, 2005
See, here we pay for TV and then we get ads, too. It's really win-win.
Permalink muppet 
August 26th, 2005
Well same difference then, right Mat? The point being they're not subscription.

Philo
Permalink Philo 
August 26th, 2005
We pay roughly £10/week per household.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/info/licencefee/
Permalink a cynic writes... 
August 26th, 2005
In a way they are - they're just a compulsory subscription;-)
Permalink a cynic writes... 
August 26th, 2005
But the BBC does make an awful lot of money from DVD/Videos IIRC, so they would surely be reluctant to allow people to freely download/record the programmes from the web unless the quality was markedly inferior.

477 all out then.
Permalink qwe 
August 26th, 2005
My cable bill excluding internet and DVR rental is $85/month.

On top of this, I get ads. Lots of ads. Even on the cable-only stations.

Why is it that more money from my bill payment isn't being passed on to the content providers, so that they don't have to interrupt their shows with advertisements every 5 minutes? You can't tell me that those eighty-five dollars are all needed to maintain their infrastructure.
Permalink muppet 
August 26th, 2005
As far as the BBC goes the very act of owning a TV means you pay for their shows, so "more exposure" is not an issue. There's some sort of charter that says they've got to provide a certain number of hours of X, Y and Z type of programming, and that it can't all be vapid crap, but from their perspective they get no more or no less money no matter how many people watch it, so unlike paid-for-by-advertising TV (where the network can charge more for an ad in a popular show than an unpopular one) the BBC wouldn't really gain by wider exposure.
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 26th, 2005
mmm...they used to make a bundle out of videos at a time when you could record your own. I don't think the beeb really follows the music industry's line on this.
Permalink a cynic writes... 
August 26th, 2005
Nobody follows the music industry's line on anything, other than the movie industry...
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 26th, 2005
The plan is to parallel the radio provision now which is to broadcast online simultaneously as broadcast time and to keep that programme available for viewing online for a week.

That depends on rights for some programmes but all the BBC's own output will be able to be broadcast online. Live events will probably suffer much as radio ones did at first.

It will be interesting to see if the BBC prosecute anyone mirroring the feed I don't think I'll be experimenting :-).
Permalink Simon Lucy 
August 26th, 2005
I'm hoping that I've just become a bit jaded with the music/film industrys and their complete disregard for their customers. I really want this to be a good service from the BBC.

How does the listen again service work for the radio at the moment? Can they be downloaded as mp3 files or something similar?
Permalink qwe 
August 26th, 2005
Some can some can't - mostly they're streamed in Real format *but* the beeb is letting some things go as mp3 on a trial basis (here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/downloadtrial/ ).
Permalink a cynic writes... 
August 26th, 2005
Cynic, it's £10 per MONTH per household. The licence fee isn't £500 a year (yet)!
Permalink Ian Boys 
August 26th, 2005
yeah, yeah I know typo Ok...
Permalink a cynic writes... 
August 26th, 2005
I just whish theu finally abandoned the Real crap.
Permalink Just me (Sir to you) 
August 30th, 2005

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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