Oops, 7 Days. Hey look I don't update on weekends.

New on the Chris McKinstry show

Chris reads some of his favorite selections aloud to a soundtrack of popular children's songs:

http://static.flickr.com/2/1887346_1e62caa920_m.jpg

Tune in later when Chris explains his freakishly long fingers and exceptionally bad coiffure.
Permalink Generic Error 
January 13th, 2006
Even in a photo that small, you can clearly see the "crazy eyes".

::shudder::

Oh yeah:

http://www.mindpixel.com/chris
Permalink Generic Error 
January 13th, 2006
My hair is better now, but yes, I have very long fingers. How else could I hold a whole galaxy between them?
Permalink Chris McKinstry 
January 13th, 2006
It's somewhat effeminate.
Permalink Colm O'Connor 
January 13th, 2006
For all of Chris' claims that he gets floods of traffic from this place, he sure shows up very quickly when he gets linked from a thread, eh?

My sites are CONSTANTLY being hit from ?off, to the point where any single hit will get lost in the regular flow of traffic and will be totally unremarkable. I certainly wouldn't check out one referrer over any other, yet some how Chris manages to zero in on new threads with alarming speed.

It's almost as though he gets hardly any hits at all.
Permalink Generic Error 
January 13th, 2006
Are you done comparing the size of your e-penis to Chris's?
Permalink Colm O'Connor 
January 13th, 2006
I ran accross a web-app recently... The something ego something that monitors blogs for your name and alerts you when it shows up.

My guess is McKinstry has a script that pings/spinders this place for his name.
Permalink MarkTAW 
January 13th, 2006
Colm it has less to do with e-penis measuring and more to do with refuting Chris' ridiculous claims of outstanding popularity. His ego BEGS for grounding.
Permalink Generic Error 
January 13th, 2006
The book in my hands is wonderful BTW...highly recommended.

Galactic Dynamics
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0691084459/104-5074834-9321547?v=glance&n=283155

Two of the world's leading astrophysicists, James Binney and Scott Tremaine, here present a comprehensive review of the theory of galactic dynamics at a level suitable for both graduate students and researchers. Their work in this volume describes our present understanding of the structure and dynamics of stellar systems such as galaxies and star clusters.

Nicknamed "the Bible of galactic dynamics," this book has become a classic treatise, well known and widely used by researchers and students of galactic astrophysics and stellar dynamics. Praised for its modern approach, as well as for the rigor and exemplary clarity with which the authors handle the material in this book, Galactic Dynamics includes classic results and data while also reflecting the many recent developments in the field. The authors maintain an effective style of exposition throughout, keeping clear what is present knowledge and what is still speculation, while allowing the reader to grasp an overview of the subject before following through (where needed) with the mathematical detail. Most of the astronomical community since the late 1980s was introduced to galactic dynamics through Galactic Dynamics, and it remains the most widely used graduate textbook in galactic astrophysics today. No other book gathers together and presents our current understanding of the field in such a clear and concise way. Through this approach, Binney and Tremaine succeeded in creating a classic reference of enormous pedagogic value.
Permalink Chris McKinstry 
January 13th, 2006
Mark - 1
Chris - nil
Permalink Colm 
January 13th, 2006
Let me guess. Connecting your name with theirs in Google.
Permalink MarkTAW 
January 13th, 2006
Nope. Trying to get people reading about phase spaces because they are reading with phase spaces. Statistical physics is good - you're soaking in it.
Permalink Chris McKinstry 
January 13th, 2006
Chris, you should read up on Heim theory

http://www.heim-theory.com/

(That should keep you from the streets for some time :-)
Permalink Erik Springelkamp 
January 13th, 2006
Gotta love geometry.
Permalink Chris McKinstry 
January 13th, 2006
Topology surely.
Permalink Simon Lucy 
January 13th, 2006
For the ones that want to deform everything.
Permalink Erik Springelkamp 
January 13th, 2006
No. I prefer to the geometers POV, thanks. See mathworld for the difference if you are a bystander:

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Hypersphere.html
Permalink Chris McKinstry 
January 13th, 2006
Did you know that the area and volume of a unit hypersphere goes to zero as the dimension increases?

While the containing hypercube goes to infinity?
Permalink Erik Springelkamp 
January 13th, 2006
It must be the surname he queries...
Permalink a cynic writes... 
January 13th, 2006
Oh! Oh! Erik is newbie. Carefull. Very carefull. The hyper-spherical McKinvortex goes to seven!
Permalink KayJay 
January 13th, 2006
And Heim theory goes to six or eight, but does predict all elementary masses (unconfirmed)
Permalink Erik Springelkamp 
January 13th, 2006
Like I said, gotta love geometry.
Permalink Chris McKinstry 
January 13th, 2006
"Are you done comparing the size of your e-penis to Chris's?"

This should be the new sidebar.
Permalink Nyuk nyuk nyuk 
January 14th, 2006
Generic Error/Mark, don't deny your love for Chris McKinstry!
Permalink The Truth Shall Set You Free 
January 14th, 2006

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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