Sanding our assholes with 150 grit.

WTF is this?

I put a box set I had for sale on Craigslist and got this response:

====
Dear Seller,
I am responding to your ad you posted for sale.
Please Let me know if it is still available for
sale and the Asking price you would be willing
to have it sold.
Hope it is in the best form of condition?
Could you please have a picture of the item emailed
To me for confirmation?

Thank You.


Brian.
====

It was soon after I posted my item, which was fairly late at night. I thought nothing of it, and sent a response saying they're in excellent condition, and he can come look at them if he wants them.

Then, I got this from him:

====
Hello Mark,
Thanks for the response to my email. You informed me that the item is
Still available for sale. And that your asking price of ($150) is the
Last your offer, which is ok by me. Please confirm ownership of this
Item to me.

Any form of clarification to show proof of ownership would be ok
( A written bill of sale upon purchase of the item OR A Written
acknowledgement that it really belongs To you would do).Please bear
with me and Thank You.

If this is acknowledged, Please rest assured that, I am purchasing
And picking up this item you have for sale, so I would want you to
Please keep off other buyer on my behalf, and for this reason I would
Be making an offer of ($250) So as to keep other buyers off.

I just moved in to Seattle, WA where I live and work right now .I
Guess I am meant to have a look at the item before making any purchase
But, I would in faith accept it is in good condition. Thank You.

I how ever would be making payment to you inform of A (Cashier Check /
USPS Money Order) .Hope any of the above Payment is acceptable by you?

I would be making Arrangement for the pickup of this Item along side a
Few purchases so I would need you to leave the pickup of this item to me.
Pickup would be arranged and made as soon as payment is received by you
And cashed at your Bank instant so as to avoid any delay.

If we do have an understanding to this Transaction, Payment would be sent to you
Immediately via a FIRST class US mail .I would need your detail for payment
To be issued and have sent to you.


Name in full.....
Address.....
City.....
State.....

Country.....
Zip code.....
Phone#.....


NOTE... I WOULD KEEP YOU UPDATED AS SOON AS PAYMENT IS
SENT AND PLEASE KEEP ME POSTED REGULARLY.

Thank You.

Brian.
====

You can get it on eBay for around $125. I was hoping someone would go for convenience pay an extra $25 to have it today. So many things about this sream SCAM that it's not funny.

Not looking for advice or anything, just wanted to share.

PS, I was just in Staples and they had no good stationery. The closest they had was some something that came in assorted colors, all of them way too dark, and some business "thank you" cards, with some mixed blanks.
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 12th, 2005
Sounds like a common scam. Cant remember what it is called.
Permalink Eric Debois 
August 12th, 2005
I think it's called "Give me your name, address, and credit card number (if it's on the receipt)."
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 12th, 2005
Did'nt we have a thread on this a while back btw?

They basicly exploit a flaw in the way banks clear checks, so you'll get the money and then the bank will want it back after a few days.
Permalink Eric Debois 
August 12th, 2005
I guess "Cashier Check / USPS Money Order" is always a Cashier Check then.
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 12th, 2005
There's a link on craigslist all about this. You should have seen it when you put something up for sale. Look at the scams page, it talks all about fake money orders.
Permalink Jared 
August 12th, 2005
http://www.craigslist.org/about/scams.html

2. distant buyer offers a high-value (but fake) cashier's check in exchange for your item

There it is. So basically they're just trying to get the item for free.

(waiting for the scammer to show up & expand this thread to 400+ posts)
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 12th, 2005
<grin> I would certainly be inclined to completely ignore those emails.

I was in Staples too at the weekend and asked them about stationery. They said they cater mainly to business customers and suggested I go to a "stationery shop" such as one nearby. I went to that shop but what they stocked was all kinds of colored card and "wallpaper fragments" (for want of a better description) and decorative materials for people to make scrapbooks out of. Not what I would have called stationery. Funny thing, but there are many shops that seem to sell colored card and rubber stamps and stuff like that. What do people do with them (apart from entertain children)?

I have given up.

But in case anyone is curious what I am missing, it is such as these:

http://www.ryman.co.uk/Three-Candle-Stick-Pad-Size-3-Pack-50-White-0206204316.asp
Permalink Ian Boys 
August 12th, 2005
"I would be making Arrangement for the pickup of this Item"

I'd reply and offer to sell him the product for cash payable on pickup of the product. Just to prolong the conversation...
Permalink Almost H. Anonymous 
August 12th, 2005
I wonder if there is any proven scam-baiting tactics for this scam.
Permalink Eric Debois 
August 12th, 2005
You must be very lonely if you want to prolong _that_ conversation.
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 12th, 2005
I know, hijacking the thread, but you tagged the PS on there... :-)
Permalink Ian Boys 
August 12th, 2005
"You must be very lonely if you want to prolong _that_ conversation."

No, bored. I want you to entertain us a bit more.
Permalink Almost H. Anonymous 
August 12th, 2005
I think this thread relates neatly to the IQ threads. Who honestly would respond to emails that use such stilted language and which lack so much in coherence? Can there really be any suckers that fall for it?
Permalink Ian Boys 
August 12th, 2005
Suckers fall for spam. Stilted language, poems, and funky characters to bypass the spam filters. I really don't get it -- who would do anything in response to an email like that?
Permalink Almost H. Anonymous 
August 12th, 2005
The broken english adds to the verisimilitude - maybe the buyer isn't a native english speaker. One of the famous viruses a few years ago used this technique: "Hello, I send you this file in order that you may respond." Someone here received it with a return address of a collaborator in Japan and thought it was legit.
Permalink Ward 
August 12th, 2005
Nigerian scam grammar is just as bad and people are falling for it. Maybe there's a brain mechanism that lowers the guard when the correspondent seems naive.
Permalink Alex 
August 12th, 2005
Newbies might fall for it. Has nothing (okay, only a little) to do with IQ, and a lot more to do with experience.
Permalink AllanL5 
August 12th, 2005
I agree, the bad grammar creates a cognitive dissonance that makes you think that just maybe this person has such an odd way of doing things that no matter how bizarre it seems, it's legit.
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 12th, 2005
"All your bases are belong to us" makes it MORE likely that it's NOT a scam?

Funny, I have just the opposite feeling about it, having seen all that Nigerian phishing mail.
Permalink AllanL5 
August 12th, 2005
In my former domestic habitat we had a newspaper aptly named The Free Press. They had one author whose entie column was devoted to scam baiting. They were hilarious reads sometimes.

Probably nowhere near as good an improvisation, but it was just all sorts of stuff like...

[I'm sorry Mr. Netherscambotte, but I have had the worse case of dissentary. It has been so bad that I dare not venture forth to my attorneys' office for the documents you requested. Rest assured that once I can stop my ritualistic strapping of Depends to my ass that I will get the power of attorney you need so you can give me my five million smackaroos. I'm running low on fluids, and could use a case of Gatorade. Do you think you could give me a small forward on my funds toward this matter?]
Permalink I am Jack's infinite id 
August 12th, 2005
A huge number of scams come out of Africa... Partly because their telco infrastructure looks like a LAN center where the admin smokes crack. I saw a picture of the poles and lines in one place... Man... try to tap one of those lines. I don't even know how the hell they control access. It looks like they literally just run a line from the house out to the pole, then go from pole to pole, crossing streets, whatever to intentionally make it next to impossible to tell where it goes.
Permalink I am Jack's infinite id 
August 12th, 2005
http://www.419eater.com/ do scam baiting. Their correspondence is boring, but the prize is a picture of the bad guy in the most humiliating poses.

(The baiters ask for pictures to "verify" the scammers' identity.)

http://www.419eater.com/images/trophy_room/samuel_eze4.jpg
Permalink Alex 
August 12th, 2005
The phraseology sounds like an Indian speaker.
Permalink me 
August 12th, 2005
If it's a cashier's check, couldn't you cash it at a currency exchange and actually get something (minus the fees)? From when I've done it, they haven't needed a SSN or anything similar, so it seems like they'd go after the first guy.

Am I completely wrong here?
Permalink KC 
August 12th, 2005
So you'd knowingly pass off a forged check?
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 12th, 2005
You don't *know* it's forged, you only *suspect* it... (Whether that's a big enough distinction for you to be able to convince yourself it's OK is another matter. :D)
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 13th, 2005
Do the p-p-powerbook stunt and send him a packet with some crap in it. He'll pay for the shipping, right? If he makes a fuss you have a fake check as evidence against him.
Permalink Eric Debois 
August 13th, 2005
If you suspect that it may be a forgery then you're obtaining money by deception by trying to cash it.
Permalink Simon Lucy 
August 13th, 2005
" If you suspect that it may be a forgery then you're obtaining money by deception by trying to cash it."


Okay, I can see it all tied up in the intent.

If you *know* it's a scam, then you're obviously a criminal too.
If you *suspect* it's a scam, then you're trying to push the risk onto someone else.


I was recently reading a thing about counterfeit money. They said that whoever gets stuck with it last, gets screwed. Therefore, generally when a store finds one, they try to pass it off to someone else instead of reporting it. They push the risk to someone else...
Permalink KC 
August 13th, 2005

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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