Reconciling assholes for nearly a decade.

Well this ain't gonna happen...

The Estonian road insurance fund is about to start claiming payments from people who own uninsured cars. The claims will be retroactive, and the payments calculated at about 3 times the normal third-party rate. On Sept. 1st, the fund will start sending out letters telling people to insure their cars or salvage them. If they don't, they will receive a bill on Oct. 1st, for all the time their car was not insured. This bill is subject to immediate collection by court services if not paid within two months.

Like fuck they will. First and foremost it will get shot down in the courts based on consumer laws - one does not have to pay for a service that one has not agreed to use.
Permalink Flasher T 
August 2nd, 2005
You don't have to have insurance? If you get caught without it here then there's legal trouble heading your way...
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 2nd, 2005
Third-party insurance is mandatory if you're driving, and you'll get a huge fine if you get caught without it, but if the car is just standing there, or you're not driving on public roads (farmer's kids on their own fields, etc), then you can very well own a car and not want to pay for insurance.
Permalink Flasher T 
August 2nd, 2005
I had a car I stored in the back of my parent's garage once (large garage, 1978 Honda Civic, I was on a cruise in the Navy...).

We dropped insurance on the car for the 9 months I was at sea. My parents got a nasty-gram from the Departement of Motor Vehicles requesting their licence plates back. Immediately.

It seems you can't keep the plates on the car if it's not insured -- fair enough, I'd say. But I didn't HAVE to insure the car, as long as I didn't put it on the public roads.
Permalink AllanL5 
August 2nd, 2005
Heh, I don't think the DMV could do that here - you've paid for the plates, I believe they are actually your property.
Permalink Flasher T 
August 2nd, 2005
The whole plates issue in the US is weird -- as far as I recall they're not actually related to the car specifically, and they're more like the Road Fund License disks in the UK.
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 2nd, 2005
You can even own several plates for the same car, as long as they're issued by different states. But if you get rid of the car and don't transfer the plates to a new car, you do have to return them to the DMV, even though you paid for them.

I believe that's what a _license_ is. Rarely do you get a license for life.
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 2nd, 2005
Again, the US is weird. My license is good for pretty much life, although I think I need to get it replaced when I start getting a bit old and doddery...
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 2nd, 2005
Hmm. I dunno, when I got rid of my car, I turned in the license plates. But I know of instances of people who buy classic cars finding old license plates and registering with them, and then there's the plephora of license plate purses and notebooks and other assorted and sundry goods.

I would imagine that each state sets it's own rules about this kind of thing.

If you had a car on the road without a license plate, how would you get a ticket? They couldn't tell who owned the car.
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 2nd, 2005
In Maryland, anyway, IF you put a car on the road without a license plate, the first state cop who saw it would pull you over immediately. He would probably not let you drive it after that, might even call for the police tow-truck and impound your car.

Driving without registration (Plates, plus that little square of paper) is highly illegal. If it weren't, just anybody could put just anything on the roads.

This is for your protection, after all. I understand in some rural states they do cut some slack for "Farm Vehicles" (tractors, pick-up trucks, etc) -- which typically don't drive on public roads except to cross from one part of the farm to another part.
Permalink AllanL5 
August 2nd, 2005
But what if you drive a car with plates, park it illegally, and then remove the plates. I think that's what the OP was implying when he said "but if the car is just standing there, or you're not driving on public roads."
Permalink MarkTAW 
August 2nd, 2005
In the UK, unless you go through the process of transferring a plate, it stays on that car forever. The plate says nothing about the owner, but gives some information about the car -- its year of registration and a general geographic point of origin -- and the only link to who owns the car is the register held by the DVLA (Driver and Vehichle Licensing Authority). When you buy a car the original owner fills in a form to say they've sold it to you, sends it to the DVLA, and you're all set.

Every year (or six months, depending on preference) you buy a Road Fund License, a little scrap of paper that you display in your windscreen saying you've stumped up the cash for the right to drive on the road (or get a free one if you're not using the car on public roads -- all cars MUST display one regardless of whether it's even roadworthy or not)...
Permalink Mat Hall 
August 2nd, 2005
+++Driving without registration (Plates, plus that little square of paper) is highly illegal. If it weren't, just anybody could put just anything on the roads.+++

So what's wrong with that? We already treat SUVs as trucks for emmissions purposes but as cars for tax purposes here in CT, why not allow them to have big belching smokestacks and tire-shredders on their hubs? We may as well. Just make them cost a lot of money so that only the trustworthy, benevolent upper-class can afford them.
Permalink muppet 
August 2nd, 2005
"In the UK, unless you go through the process of transferring a plate, it stays on that car forever."

Same thing here in Portugal. The plate is the car's ID number, so to speak.
Permalink Paulo Caetano 
August 2nd, 2005
In my state, if you don't surrender your plates immediately, you'll continue to pay property tax on whatever car they were on last.
Permalink muppet 
August 2nd, 2005
"I think that's what the OP was implying when he said "but if the car is just standing there, or you're not driving on public roads." "

No, I was implying that the car is parked in my garage, I'm just not using it for the time being. For example, if I drive a Smart every day to go to work and the shops, but have a Volvo 240 station wagon that I use once a year when I go on vacation. Third-party insurance can be bought for as little as one day, so I can just buy a month's worth whenever I use the Volvo. Now, the government is saying they're going to introduce this policy and charge me 3x the cost of insurance for the time it's been standing in my garage uninsured.
Permalink Flasher T 
August 2nd, 2005
"In my state, if you don't surrender your plates immediately, you'll continue to pay property tax on whatever car they were on last."

There is actually no property tax on cars in Estonia.
Permalink Flasher T 
August 2nd, 2005
In Connecticut, I'm lucky not to pay property taxes on my fucking shoes.
Permalink muppet 
August 2nd, 2005
<MarkTAW>If you had a car on the road without a license plate, how would you get a ticket? They couldn't tell who owned the car. </MarkTAW>

Probably the vehicle identification number (VIN), which is normally displayed at the upper left corner of the dashboard where it meets the windshield (windscreen for you Brits).

While on the subject of VINs, it's easy for a thief to steal your car if they copy the VIN and using it get a copy of your car key or door opener from the car dealer. As a precaution against this, I've covered my VIN with a piece of duct tape. You may want to do the same.
Permalink Dana (formerly Blue State Bitch) 
August 2nd, 2005
Oh my god ... I just saw that Muppet lives in Connecticut. Could we be neigbhors?
Permalink Dana (formerly Blue State Bitch) 
August 2nd, 2005
The world, may never know.
Permalink muppet 
August 2nd, 2005
Maybe Dana is Crazy Asian Lady?
Permalink Flasher T 
August 2nd, 2005
Could be.
Permalink muppet 
August 2nd, 2005
"If you had a car on the road without a license plate, how would you get a ticket? They couldn't tell who owned the car."

There was a guy in Maryland who got a license plate that read "NO PLATE". He thought it would be cute and might get him out of a ticket or two.

Unfortunately, the way the system was set up it worked the other way - all the citations in the system that read "NO PLATE" attached to him like antibodies...

Philo
Permalink Philo 
August 2nd, 2005
I suppose it could be useful - the clerks would be so used to clearing up "misunderstandings" that they'd cancel all his tickets as well.
Permalink Flasher T 
August 2nd, 2005
Eh, false alarm - apparently you are only obliged to get a contract with an insurance company, but don't need an active policy all the time. If you're not driving the car for an extended period, just put a stop on the policy and not pay anything.
Permalink Flasher T 
August 3rd, 2005

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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