Sanding our assholes with 150 grit. Slowly. Lovingly.

the anti-Trump or how to hire programmers

a load of bollocks?

"When one of job candidates was about to withdraw from the project because the BF Game had crashed her computer, Brooke gave her a computer to replace it so that she would stay in."

anything wrong with that picture?
Permalink Jesus H Christ 
January 22nd, 2006
Interesting.

Nonetheless a few things come to mind:

-So the guy made a game. Great. Reimplement it in countless turing complete languages - one better suited to the market skill levels, not to mention supporting tools and libraries - and release. Awesome! I mean what sort of insane fanatic is going to individually train developers to an obscure, barely used and barely supported language just because they're fanatical?

-Being a l33t APL programmer basically ensures you some of the most boring computer jobs available, working on batch processing apps in the backrooms of insurance companies. Well, that's until they all outsource it all to external vendors who have implemented their solutions in Java/.NET/C++/Whatever.
Permalink Dennis Forbes 
January 22nd, 2006
I think the point here is the guy's attitude, juxtaposed with that of Trump's.

So they're APL programmers, and there is probably not much of a market for them. But they've also proven that they can learn new languages and build working products in them, and that's a skill that would be desired by a lot of companies.
Permalink thinker 
January 23rd, 2006
"So they're APL programmers, and there is probably not much of a market for them."

I didn't say there wasn't a market for them - The market may be small, but there's very few vying for the jobs, so they'll probably have a pretty easy time with it. That is of course until this article catches on, and everyone with similar goals runs out and learns APL.

"But they've also proven that they can learn new languages and build working products in them, and that's a skill that would be desired by a lot of companies."

Simply being involved in this competition puts a bit of a question mark on the candidates skills and experience, so I don't know if it's really net beneficial. Sounds more like desperation.
Permalink Dennis Forbes 
January 23rd, 2006
I don't see anything inherently wrong with the competition format.

Instead of looking at it like a reality show (which is what the article unfortunately compares it to), look at it as a vetting process.

Like those puzzles Google put in magazines a while back. Or the coding problems you have to submit to apply at ITA Software. It's like "if you can tough this out, you've probably got skills we want."
Permalink thinker 
January 23rd, 2006
If you've *ever* used APL, you'll remember it as a "write only" language.
Permalink Peter 
January 23rd, 2006
> So they're APL programmers, and there is probably not much of a market for them.

What Dennis said. I happen to know one, or rather did before we lost contact, and he worked about six months of the year. When the next contract came up, great, but he was a long way from hurting finanically. He did have a hard time filling his long holidays, but he didn't seem to be losing any sleep over it...
Permalink  
January 23rd, 2006
This was OK because people got a free class out of it and some software. Maybe he bought them lunch as well, I hope so. I would hate to have a month long interview about my C++ skills with no payoff.
Permalink Art Wilkins 
January 23rd, 2006

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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