They don't even serve pork lunch in Porky the movie!

Nice article on diet

https://zenhabits.net/plants/
Permalink Sangamon 
March 20th, 2017 4:06pm
A Planet-based diet?  Who eats planets these days?
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
March 20th, 2017 4:07pm
A Mars a day helps you work rest and play
Permalink The Joker 
March 20th, 2017 4:10pm
;-)
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
March 20th, 2017 4:15pm
Nothing about the cons?
Permalink Kenny the Robot 
March 20th, 2017 4:20pm
Too restrictive.

I guess I'm 80% plant-based since I eat a lot of fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds and legumes, but I also eat meat and eggs.
Permalink NPR 
March 21st, 2017 7:55am
For the past couple nights, though, I've had a meal of noodles, veggies and tempeh (fermented tofu and rice cake).
Permalink NPR 
March 21st, 2017 7:56am
Tempeh is very nice. I eat it several times per week.

I bake it for about 15 minute until it is golden brown and slightly crunchy, then stir with some sweet soy sauce (Ketjap) and chilli-paste (Sambal).

It can easily replace meat, but I usually add a little bit of spicy chicken or beef, that I divide in several small portions to enjoy the taste, rather than for main protein use.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 21st, 2017 8:36am
Hey Lotti, you're Dutch? Interesting that the Indonesian influence is strong there.

I like my tempeh stir-fried, but I'll have to try baking it. Sounds good.
Permalink NPR 
March 21st, 2017 10:13am
Interesting about using small amounts of meat, basically as a condiment. I generally keep my portions pretty small, too.
Permalink NPR 
March 21st, 2017 10:14am
Another thing I love is sweet potatoes. I eat them practically every day, alternating between garnet yams and purple ones.
Permalink NPR 
March 21st, 2017 10:15am
> I like my tempeh stir-fried, but I'll have to try baking it. Sounds good.

I only use very little oil, just enough to slightly fatten the pan. Then it is almost like grilling. Shaking it regularly to get all sides brown.

But that only works for 1-person portions, as all pieces must touch the bottom of the pan.

When Indonesion people make family sized portions, they use much more oil like you do, and use a two phase preparation: first browning in oil and then, out of the oil, simmering in a spicy mixture for taste, but I like the crispiness of only adding the aroma's quickly.

I just came back shopping with a portion restaurant-made rendang. With that stuff, only a tiny piece can fully flavour a mouth full of rice.

Indonesian flavours have entered Dutch kitchen for over a century now. When there was still conscription in the army, until the 1980's, all the soldiers enjoyed their Wednesday Nasi Goreng. With krupuk and pickles.

And saté has become one of the classics in common cafeteria's here, and as a spin-off, Flemish fries with peanut sauce.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 21st, 2017 10:35am
When I was a kid (40 years ago), people returning from a holiday in Holland would relate stories of the Dutch and their weird proclivity for putting mayo on their french-fries.

These days we do it ourselves.
Permalink Sangamon 
March 21st, 2017 10:40am
Mayo plus peanut butter on fries: patatje oorlog (fries of war), the ultimate caloric-bomb for the lower Dutch classes.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 21st, 2017 10:50am
I regularly buy ready made Indonesian food here:

http://www.rima-groningen.nl/specialiteiten
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
March 21st, 2017 10:57am
"rendang. With that stuff, only a tiny piece can fully flavour a mouth full of rice. "

Beef rendang is a delicious and filling dish.
Permalink NPR 
March 21st, 2017 11:33am

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