I keep hearing about this Amazon thing. Maybe some day I will try it.

Sweden drops Assange investigation

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-39973864

Will they reimburse the UK for millions wasted on trying to arrest Assange?
Permalink Yoda 
May 19th, 2017 5:09am
That was a free choice for the UK.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 19th, 2017 5:12am
The UK govt were currying favour with the US, they don't give a fuck about Sweden.

At one point they were seriously considering raiding the embassy which is...

1) a violation of international law

2) a de-facto declaration of war on Equador
Permalink Sangamon 
May 19th, 2017 5:27am
Wasn't it Equador claiming the Falklands Islands?

In other words, it's not a complete roadblock.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
May 19th, 2017 8:04am
Falklands was Argentina
Permalink Sangamon 
May 19th, 2017 8:14am
Ah.  I suspected I had it wrong.

Still, the point stands.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
May 19th, 2017 8:14am
The question now is will the British police arrest him anyway if he emerges from the embassy and then deport him to the US.

Assange isn't a US citizen, what law has he broken that makes him legally deportable to the US?

(sadly, I suspect the UK govt doesn't care about this).
Permalink Sangamon 
May 19th, 2017 9:14am
Ecuador not Equador. Grr.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 9:17am
"will British police arrest him anyway"?

The article says they were specifically asked this question and answered yes: "Police in London said they would still be obliged to arrest him if he left. The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) said Mr Assange still faced the lesser charge of failing to surrender to a court, an offence punishable by up to a year in prison or a fine."

We do this a lot in the US.

A person is arrested for protesting and turns out what the cop was mad about was legal and there was no basis for arrest. Rather than release the person or charge the cop with false arrest, the person is charged with "resisting arrest".

A person is sent to prison and escapes. It's discovered that they are totally innocent of the original charges. Now they just have to finish their 20 yr sentence for escaping from prison.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 9:21am
Ecuador is so named because of the Equator.

It is therefore a Spanish corruption of the correct spelling.

It's not their fault that they're ignorant spics.
Permalink Sangamon 
May 19th, 2017 9:27am
I have similar problems with Bombay.

The English name chosen for 'Mumbai' was Bombay, it's how be originally chose to render the name for that city into English.

Given that the 'original' name was English or the Roman alphabet, how we chose to render it was up to us.

Changing it now is just pandering.
Permalink Sangamon 
May 19th, 2017 9:32am
In the Ayamara language, Ikwaduraxa is the name of the tribe that lives in that part of the continent of Awya Yalana, which is itself part of the entire planet called Jach'a marka.

The Ikwaduraxa are the people of Ikwadur.

Ikwadur has nothing to do with the Equator. However the Ayamara word Ikwadur is a homonym for the spanish word which is spelled ecuador.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 9:36am
> At one point they were seriously considering raiding the embassy which is...

No.  The only person who seriously suggested that was Assange.

> The question now is will the British police arrest him anyway if he emerges from the embassy

Yes, he is wanted for violation of his bail

> and then deport him to the US.

No, or not unless the US has their own extradition quest.


The logic of the Assange supporters is mind-bending

1. First the allege that Britain wants to extradite him to Sweden, so that Sweden could extradite him to the US. Why would they do that, which is much complicated than simply extraditing him directly to the US.

2. They assume that Sweden wants to extradite him to the US, but only after the rape charges were brought. Sweden could have arrested him and extradited to the US directly, at any point during the months he was hanging about in Sweden.

3. They assume that Britain wants to extradite him to the US, but again only after the Swedish extradition charges were brought.  He was hanging around in the UK for months, and they could have simply processed any US extradition before any Sweden extradition (assume Sweden suddenly now wasn't complicit despite point 1).
Permalink MobyDobie 
May 19th, 2017 9:39am
Nice try, the Ayamara are Peru, not Equador.

You're bullshitting, so Citation needed.
Permalink Sangamon 
May 19th, 2017 9:45am
Why the fuck would Assange suggest the British invade the embassy?

Reuters claim otherwise:

http://uk.reuters.com/article/us-wikileaks-assange-ecuador-idUSBRE87E16N20120816
Permalink Sangamon 
May 19th, 2017 9:49am
Read it yourself, assuming you speak Ayamara.

https://ay.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nayriri_uñstawi
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 9:53am
http://uk.reuters.com/article/us-wikileaks-assange-ecuador-idUSBRE87E16N20120816

Yes, the British explicitly threatened to violently raid the Ecuador embassy and the threat created an international incident. It was all over the news world wide.

Yet Moby Doby feels comfortable blatantly lying about it all in order to advance his agenda.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 9:55am
Maybe the etymology is reversed?

Ikwadur -> Ecuador -> Equator ?

Who knew!
Permalink Sangamon 
May 19th, 2017 10:00am
The OED says starting in the 1300s "aequator diei et noctis" referred to the days when night and day were equal length, ie the equinoxes. Later, earliest reference 1610, it was applied to the location on earth above which the sun was on that day.

Spanish, Portuguese and Italian ships though were traveling south across the equator though before anyone from europe visited Ecuador. Pizarro was the first, in 1530. Ecuador was defeated and a Spanish colony by 1544. And named after the word used in several of the local languages for that particular province of the Inca empire.

But what did the Spanish call the equator or did they even think of it as a thing before 1610. Something else apparently, or nothing.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 1:41pm
Your speculation is not impossible though. "aequator diei et noctis" meaning two special days suddenly meaning equator is not unreasonable, but it's not obvious either and there's no direct path between the terms. By the time the spanish word ecuador starts meaning the equator, Ecuador, named after the local indigenous name, has been a Spanish colony for several decades. Maybe the "aequator diei et noctis" story is an incorrect guess.

It's like how the first european expeditions to south america first saw a mountain range along the Mosquito coast. In the local Miskito indian language, those mountains were called "America" and when explorers asked what they called this place, pointing at the mountains, they said "America". The term was then used to refer to this area and Brazil by explorers. Later a German cartographer labelled it on his map and added some notes about an Italian explorer with a similar sounding name, incorrectly assuming it was named after him. But America was an indian term.

Also the Mosquito coast is known for its mosquitos and malaria. So that's why it's called that right? Wrong. It's named after the Miskito indians. There is no etymological connection at all between the Mosquito coast and the mosquito insect. They are terms from totally unrelated languages. Just like Ecuador and ecuador.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 1:49pm
I am sure Idiot is interested in this Flemish author who proves with geographical names that Homer's' Ulysses happened around the North Sea.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 19th, 2017 1:54pm
I'd like to say you're the most ignorant person I know, but I know other people here.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 1:59pm
> But what did the Spanish call the equator or did they even think of it as a thing before 1610. Something else apparently, or nothing.

Modern globes and modern cartography were invented in the 1520's at the University of Louvain, in Brabant, ruled by Charles V, King of Spain (Emperor of the FRE etc. etc.)

Navigating by measuring the altitude of stars and sun was already being used.

The concept of meridians was used in the Treaty of Tordesillas of 1494. (Pope, Portugal, Spain).

It is certain that the Spanish sailors knew the concept of the equator in 1530.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 19th, 2017 2:07pm
Can you read? Or do your own research if you don't like my references, you pinheaded imbecile.

It wasn't called the equator until 1610. Long after Ecuador was called ecuador because that was the Spanishization of the native term for the area.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 2:13pm
Practical navigational techniques, ship logbooks, good maps, etc. were considered important strategic state secrets, so it is very probable that we never find written sources of much late Mediaeval knowledge of this field.

The real knowledge has to be inferred through indirect analysis, remnants of tools, little details of drawings, etc.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 19th, 2017 2:15pm
https://books.google.nl/books?id=GJ0bwuMpqOoC&pg=PT192&lpg=PT192&dq=%22De+principiis+astronomiae+et+cosmographiae%22+equator&source=bl&ots=QWLCVEdlOL&sig=_g3uQNPMxKQOcceXTOdQDU93zGg&hl=nl&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiK_97hy_zTAhVBLFAKHSX1A7MQ6AEIPDAE#v=onepage&q=%22De%20principiis%20astronomiae%20et%20cosmographiae%22%20equator&f=false

Here in 'De principiis astronomiae et cosmographiae', Gemma Frisius, Louvain, 1530, calls the great circle Aequator.

"et est circulus magnus ..."

is the great circle ... that divides .. in two equal parts.
etc. etc.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 19th, 2017 2:27pm
So Idiot, you can put your Oxford Dictionary up your arse!
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 19th, 2017 2:28pm
Gemma Frisius grew up in Groningen, btw.

He was raised by a baker's family after becoming an orphan in the Frisian city of Dokkum.
Permalink Lotti Fuehrscheim 
May 19th, 2017 2:31pm
No that's good, real references. OED is often speculative shit anyway.

So 1530 aequator used in latin texts to mean equator and same year Pizarro arrives in Ecuador and sometime between then and 1544 they are calling it Ecuador.

The local indian name being a homonym though is totally absurd to ignore. That is clearly the origin of the nation's name.
Permalink Pestular Croaker 
May 19th, 2017 2:49pm
> Yes, the British explicitly threatened to violently raid the Ecuador embassy and the threat created an international incident. It was all over the news world wide.

They suggested they might remove accreditation from the embassy  - allowing them to enter.    That would involve breaking diplomatic relations.  That isn't the same as violently storming it, or even planning to violently storm it.
Permalink MobyDobie 
May 19th, 2017 5:13pm

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