Nobody likes to be called a dummy by a dummy.

Photo.net is genius!

I go there sometimes because frankly there are no larger site out there on the discussion of photography. Lately I've been trying to learn lighting and catalog work and I was shocked to learn photo.net has been doing reader-contributed tutorials. Weekly lighting themes is the one I am checking out now, and it's just lovely. You learn how to light up a product like wine, or jewelry, or blades of grass specked with dew drops. You can't lose. I think Dennis Forbes is trying to do something similar with his website (check out latest post on JOS), do you think we should do the same? Write tutorials for our trade? Or is it just rehashing MSDN?
Permalink Li-fan Chen 
March 20th, 2005
++ to photo.net

I think somewhere which is a place where serious articles are published and not the 'I am an Expert, flame me' and which isn't affiliated to any particular platform or publisher would be worth while.

Dr Dobbs used to be the publisher for this kind of thing and Byte could have been but both have captitulated.

My favourite ever technical magazine was Micro-Cornucopia which was more a fanzine but you'll find many of the current technical journalists got a start writing for it.

A place like Micro-Cornucopia online would be cool.
Permalink Simon Lucy 
March 20th, 2005
"I think somewhere which is a place where serious articles are published and not the 'I am an Expert, flame me' and which isn't affiliated to any particular platform or publisher would be worth while."

What makes a "particular platform or publisher" more worthwhile? Right of realm? I think what you're really saying is "only the annoited should be allowed to do such a thing".

Personally I treat the internet more as a meritocrisy, and if someone or some group offers superior and proven information, they become one of my trusted links.

Indeed I find it interesting that you correlate association with superiority, when I actually have the inverse opinion (I just happened to be reading an MSDN article, who I've written for and respect, where the author seriously proposed that you should write your client-side web page scripts in VBScript. Where else but on a Microsoft site would an internet technology page actually advocate such a ridiculous thing? That's the wonders of agendas and biases).
Permalink Dennis Forbes 
March 20th, 2005
"I think Dennis Forbes is trying to do something similar with his website (check out latest post on JOS), do you think we should do the same?"

The impetus of my effort is that I've expended a lot of time and effort to provide helpful documentation and tips for my peers in the industry, and for that I've received tens of thousands of unique readers. I don't get paid for it, although I do indirectly get paid in that professionally it has assisted my reputation.

I decided to start to aggregate it, and pursue some of the other features that I've always wanted to do for the database community (I've got a lot of neat little things that I've played around with, but never wanted to put online while I figured out the focus of each of the domains).

If I can help other writers/experts earn some reputation points, then that is gravy. If they can help me build an information powerhouse for this community, then even better.
Permalink Dennis Forbes 
March 20th, 2005
I think you've read it upside down.

I agree, platform sponsored writing tends to promote products.
Permalink Simon Lucy 
March 20th, 2005
Sorry about the confusion there.
Permalink Dennis Forbes 
March 20th, 2005
That was *really* entertaining. Do it again! [grin]

Seriously, I agree with the idea. There is no reason things like "what's the best schema for handling personnel" or "should I load collection objects in the collection or in the member object?" shouldn't be on an agnostic site.

I guess the problem you have to anticipate is dealing with stuff that *isn't* strictly technology agnostic. :/

Philo
Permalink Philo 
March 20th, 2005
But our services as objective moderators are available, for the right price.
Permalink Simon Lucy 
March 20th, 2005
>> Dr Dobbs used to be the publisher for this kind of thing and Byte could have been but both have captitulated. <<

Let's not even mention PC Magazine, which as far as I'm concerned, is nothing but a synopsis of recent press releases.

I dropped Dr Dobbs when they became less relevant to my needs, and the quality of the writing fell to undergraduate levels.

There will always be a place for focused, topical, and well-written articles, no matter what the subject (computers or photography). But print media doesn't seem to be able to do it profitably.
Permalink example 
March 20th, 2005
The computer magazines never had a chance. We'll just have to wait for the day when all the online mags consolidate. The only difference is that their output medium is no longer paper. Everything else is the same. A good friend of mine is thoroughly convinced yellow pages are here to stay. I am firmly convinced it's going to get thinner. Anyone remember when Computer Paper had 700 full color pages? This was before Dell. So yeah, those yellow pages will stay bulky, until the world figures out Fogcreek CityDesk.
Permalink Li-fan Chen 
March 20th, 2005

This topic was orginally posted to the off-topic forum of the
Joel on Software discussion board.

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