Here you are now. What?

Starbuck - talk of the town

At the 125th Street Starbucks, Simon quickly noticed a couple of irregularities, such as the hoop earrings belonging to one barista (“She shouldn’t be allowed to wear those”) and the lack of any ambient music or CDs for purchase. (Simon has obtained a copy of the employees’ manual, and is contemplating applying for a summer job.) The store was busy and cramped—too cramped, he thought—and lacked the usual niceties like upholstered furniture. The dinginess struck him as more than coincidence. “It’s a classic American story,” he said. “African-Americans get less of everything.”

http://www.newyorker.com/talk/content/articles/060109ta_talk_mcgrath
Permalink  
January 3rd, 2006
I don't get this sentence:
"and the lack of any ambient music or CDs for purchase. (Simon has obtained a copy of the employees’ manual, and is contemplating applying for a summer job.)"

I'm also interested in the idea that someone who is writing a book about Starbucks never talks to patrons there. I understand the "don't talk" convention, but wouldn't he get a lot more out of visits if he engaged the usual patrons?

Finally, with respect to the quality of the establishment - aren't Starbucks franchises?

Philo
Permalink Philo 
January 3rd, 2006
No, Starbucks are not franchises.
Permalink scrappy 
January 3rd, 2006
Oops, you found an error!