Give ne back my hat!

Too much water

We don't have a hurricane here in the Netherlands, but this week it is raining heavily, and the low lands behind the coast are filling up with water.

To increasing the pumping capacity the steam pump from 1920 in Friesland has been started up, as happens once every one or two years, in case of emergency.

The old steam engine is still operational, with some effort of maintenance. It is also a heritage site and museum.

If you like steam engines:
https://youtu.be/wqgsSSc_6yw
Permalink Lotti Fuehscheim 
September 10th, 2017 2:11pm
That is extremely cool.

There are some places in the US that maintain working steam engines to give demonstrations, like museums and amusement parks, but I've never heard of any being maintained because they are still regularly used for things.
Permalink Reality Check 
September 10th, 2017 2:38pm
They are used for things, but not for their original purpose, or things like you show there.
Permalink Reality Check 
September 10th, 2017 2:38pm
Netherlands has the dike system to contain water when the sea flooding in. I don't quite understand how it works. Where do they pump the water to? Some rivers that go inland? I don't see how they pump it back out to the sea since the water will come back in again.
Permalink WildRiver 
September 10th, 2017 2:38pm
Yeah to the sea. Imagine your question asking how it is possible to pump out water from the bilge of a boat. If you pump it to the sea it will come in again. Yes, true. But you still pump it there.
Permalink Reality Check 
September 10th, 2017 3:08pm
Yeah, but if you have a few rivers running to France I would pump the water there. ;-) lol. Let the French have some flooding.
Permalink WildRiver 
September 10th, 2017 3:10pm
Wow, that's a pretty serious steam plant. Like an ocean liner.

It can shift 4000 tonnes of water a minute, I read that right did I?
Permalink Trog 
September 10th, 2017 3:20pm
> It can shift 4000 tonnes of water a minute, I read that right did I?

Yes.
Permalink Lotti Fuehscheim 
September 10th, 2017 4:47pm
> Yeah, but if you have a few rivers running to France I would pump the water there. ;-) lol. Let the French have some flooding.

It is the other way around.

The Meuse is a major French river that flows through Belgium into the Netherlands, and merges with the Rhine.

So the Netherlands gets Swiss, German, French and Belgian rainwater, but that is not what threatens Friesland where this steam engine is. That water just falls on Friesland itself.

For massive rain in the South, there are now areas along the Rhine that can be flooded to accommodate a peak wave through the rivers. But that creates some inconveniences.
Permalink Lotti Fuehscheim 
September 10th, 2017 4:55pm
> Netherlands has the dike system to contain water when the sea flooding in.

Actually most dikes, including the oldest ones, are to keep rainwater out of low lying areas - former high peat fields that have collapsed because of the exploitation.

The water is kept in a canal system that has a water level above the low lying fields. From the canal system the water flows to the see, usually by flushing during low tide.

And then there are the outer strong sea and river dikes that protect the whole system against extreme tides of the sea, and that contain sluices for the above mentioned flushing.

Except for the river Rhine, that flows permanently, unless in extreme cases, once every 10 years or so, a flood barrier is closed near Rotterdam.
Permalink Lotti Fuehscheim 
September 10th, 2017 5:10pm

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