RIP Philo

Gradle

Any of you have relevant experience with it?

Started looking into it since it seems it supports both Java and native C++ projects but the complexity compared to Maven seems to me at this point as Core Java compared to Spring Framework.

Like I estimate it'll take me some 10 years to really get good at Gradle. Problem's given past experience with software tools, would it be a reasonable time investment to know Gradle? Like not just inherit some project to maintain and on occasion post a "can I haz teh configz" question on StackOverflow. Actually getting to know what one is doing with a reasonably good probability of getting a return on this knowledge investment and not be hopelessly superseded by some 98%-incompatible Waddle build system.
Permalink Io 
February 13th, 2018 5:54am
From their web site: "Gradle is one of my very favorite tools, and finding a developer who doesn't yet use Gradle is like finding a movie fan who hasn't yet seen The Godfather."

Statements like that annoy me. For something that literally every developer on the planet uses, according to them, how come no one I know has used it or heard of it. I know their answer already, "Guess you guys just aren't on the cutting edge." OK, well for cutting edge, isn't it strange that literally everyone uses it? Cutting edge usually means just a few use it. "Oh well everyone who is anyone uses it. Guess you are no one." OK.

Interesting for something used in everything how nothing I install requires it to build.
Permalink Reality Check 
February 13th, 2018 10:04am
30 years ago I had build systems as part of my IDE that didn't require me to know anything about the build system or that it even existed. It just worked.

Now you need to take a class in how to build, and have a whole shelf full of books.

Yet no new features have been added. All that's happened is everything's in the tool is written in some weird ass language (Groovy, Haskell, Scala) and the whole process requires tons of handholding by specialists.
Permalink Reality Check 
February 13th, 2018 10:06am
>> Yet no new features have been added. All that's happened is everything's in the tool is written in some weird ass language (Groovy, Haskell, Scala) and the whole process requires tons of handholding by specialists.

Appears so, at least compared to Maven who had a steep learning curve but at least didn't involve a weird ass language.

But apparently this Groovy thing is *the* scripting language. Superseding bash that is, or so they claim.
Permalink Io 
February 13th, 2018 1:03pm
They don't call it the "bleeding edge" for nothing!
Permalink Pie 
February 14th, 2018 6:42am
>> Now you need to take a class in how to build, and have a whole shelf full of books.

Man you sound like such a 2010 programmer.

Now you need a year of intensive training not just to build your code. You have to learn to manage and maintain multiple branches, each with it's set of incremental releases. You need to set up and maintain a continuous integration server who builds every one of those branches, also development branches after a pull request and before merge into trunk is granted. And of course have your unit tests and code quality checks run over those builds and imagine what a developer gets when they break a build if just for breaking an unit test they are taken outside, lined to a wall and shot. Fire any developers that don't reach 98% test coverage and 89% code quality. Overall you gotta be an expert in Gradle, Groovy, Bitbucket, Sonar, Jira, Jenkins, and a dozen other of lesser reputation but no lesser importance.
Permalink Io 
February 14th, 2018 9:47am
Yeah you're not kidding.

Pardon me for simplifying how bad things are.
Permalink Reality Check 
February 14th, 2018 10:11am

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