Reconciling assholes for nearly a decade.

N00bish Linux question

For some reason, I have the 'kacpid' daemon being run as root on startup when I need the 'acpid' daemon to run instead.

For one thing, I can't kill kacpid even when I do:

sudo kill [pid]

It doesn't give an error, but it doesn't die, either.  It doesn't seem to be REstarting, because the pid doesn't change no matter how many attempts I make.

Anyhow, how do I prevent kacpid from starting and start acpid instead?
Permalink Send private email muppet 
July 19th, 2006 4:01pm
There's nothing that looks like it's starting kacpid in /etc/init.d

Oh yeah this is Ubuntu 6.06 of course.  :-)
Permalink Send private email muppet 
July 19th, 2006 4:04pm
Hm...try sudo find / -name S??kacpid and look for it in rc directories.
Permalink Send private email Aaron F Stanton 
July 19th, 2006 4:08pm
hmmm, apparently there's no such command as 'kacpid'.  'acpid' DOES show up in /etc/init.d

so maybe it just identifies itself as 'kacpid' when running?  I don't get it.

All this because I can't get my fucking laptop screen to shut off when I close the frigging lid.
Permalink Send private email muppet 
July 19th, 2006 4:10pm
Do you have kdm installed?
Permalink Send private email Aaron F Stanton 
July 19th, 2006 4:11pm
gdm
Permalink Send private email muppet 
July 19th, 2006 4:12pm
acp is probably just not working properly on your laptop Muppet.  I don't have a lot to do with it myself, but according to the OpenBSD developers (which is just getting support for acp) every computer seems to implement it slightly differently, and they're all a little fruity.
Permalink Send private email Clay Dowling (Village Idiot) 
July 19th, 2006 4:13pm
Weird.  The debian package repository doesn't show kacpid in any packages, but acpid is there.

Beats me, dude.
Permalink Send private email Aaron F Stanton 
July 19th, 2006 4:14pm
kill [pid] will gently ask a process to quit. If the process is blocked or does not want to cooperate, it won't do it. So in such a case, use:

kill -9 [pid]

This will send SIGKILL to the process. This signal is not handled by the process itself but by the scheduler/process manager in the operating system.
Permalink Methuselah (Cynic since Jul 06) 
July 19th, 2006 4:17pm
Won't the initd just start it back up again immediately?  (Or whatever that process is that starts root processes).
If the configuration file is set that way?
Permalink AllanL5 
July 19th, 2006 4:24pm
dewd@buggy:~$ ps ax | grep acpi
    9 ?        S<    0:00 [kacpid]
  96 ?        S<    0:00 [kacpid-work-0]
3703 ?        Ss    0:00 /usr/sbin/acpid -c /etc/acpi/events -s /var/run/acpid.socket
3884 ?        S      0:00 /usr/lib/hal/hald-addon-acpi
4904 pts/1    R+    0:00 grep acpi
dewd@buggy:~$

On my system it's running as well. Does this output help in anything?
Permalink Quartet 
July 19th, 2006 6:00pm
Also:

dewd@buggy:~$ ls /etc/init.d/acpi*
/etc/init.d/acpid  /etc/init.d/acpi-support
dewd@buggy:~$
Permalink Quartet 
July 19th, 2006 6:01pm
VillageIdiot++
Permalink Send private email Funny Bunny 
July 19th, 2006 7:01pm

This topic is archived. No further replies will be accepted.

Other topics: July, 2006 Other topics: July, 2006 Recent topics Recent topics