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Programmers are way overpaid

I have worked in industry for 10 years. And I have yet to meet a programmer that was worth the salary that he was being paid.

Actually, the programmers that use open source tech, Ruby, Python don't get paid that much.  They are pretty good and worth their salt.  And the small company consultants are also normally good.  But big industry, Enterprise developers get paid 80, 150k, 200k for poor use of technology, poor design and code that ultimately can't be maintained and costs a business money.

If you have 30 developers at 80k.  Are they worth 2 million dollars?  I have yet to see it.
Permalink formerly known as NerdtreeBot 
November 29th, 2010 8:32pm
You haven't spent a day on the job with me. I actually work when I am at work.
Permalink Fan boy 
November 29th, 2010 10:11pm
Jerking off to US flag in most part of the world is not considered work, fanboy.
Permalink Just Sayin' 
November 29th, 2010 11:01pm
Notice how fanboy said he "works hard".  A gardener working in the field works hard.

But do you, fanboy, believe that the income that you receive is equal to or more than what your company receives in return?
Permalink formerly known as Nerdtree 
November 29th, 2010 11:11pm
I was closer to the billing and receipts at the last company I worked for. I made several of the contract negotiations myself with the customers. I then worked to complete the product and its delivery.

So yes, I knew exactly what I was costing the company and how much money I was bringing in. They were very sad to see me go. I left two years ago, and they've tried to get me back several times. The most recent was two months ago.
Permalink Fan boy 
November 29th, 2010 11:39pm
I work at a software company that makes more in annual revenue than the cost of it's combined technical staff, yes.
Permalink hoyza 
November 30th, 2010 9:25am
"And I have yet to meet a programmer that was worth the salary that he was being paid."

Maybe, this is true of other job types as well.
Permalink armchair Freud. 
November 30th, 2010 9:27am
Our office has 7 developers and our office's products bring in about $10,000,000/year. Our office has 60% profit margin compared to the rest of the division's typical 15% margin.
Permalink Peter 
November 30th, 2010 9:37am
"And I have yet to meet a programmer that was worth the salary that he was being paid."

Two of them just posted here man, me and peter.
Permalink hoyza 
November 30th, 2010 10:38am
Well, sure, but he hasn't "met" you, so that doesn't count.  Or, no matter WHAT you do, HE doesn't think it makes you worth it.

Quite a catch, that Catch-22.
Permalink SaveTheHubble 
November 30th, 2010 10:41am
> Quite a catch, that Catch-22.

At 22 everything is still firm and bouncy.
Permalink Pat Downs 
November 30th, 2010 11:54am
Everybody is overpaid.  They have child labor in some countries working for pennies per hour.

You get what you can get.  Period.
Permalink Kenny 
November 30th, 2010 4:37pm
"Actually, the programmers that use open source tech, Ruby, Python don't get paid that much.  They are pretty good and worth their salt."

A lot of these people are merely assembling Lego blocks that someone else already made for them.  Not very tough.

"And the small company consultants are also normally good."

heh, there are lots of little crap shops out there.  After you've been in the industry a while you see them come and go and come and go and come and go.

"But big industry, Enterprise developers get paid 80, 150k, 200k for poor use of technology, poor design and code that ultimately can't be maintained and costs a business money."

This is usually not the programmers fault.  It's a business/management philosophy.  To maximize the profit margin they push programmers to churn and burn.
Permalink . 
December 1st, 2010 12:53am
Not to mention Agile is vogue at many biggies.  Agile tells you to not optimize or even write good code until it is necessary.  Wait for the customer to complain.  Agile also pushes for little up front planning.

Agile is OK for small projects, but as people are finding out it doesn't always cut it for large ones.
Permalink . 
December 1st, 2010 1:00am

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